Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Culture, religion and ethnicity

Challenges caused by prevailing group practices or accepted social norms.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Culture, religion and ethnicity

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
This case study is one of the five winning entries from the 2019 GDI Case Study Competition. In Morales, a predominately rural municipality in Colombia with a large indigenous population, there was a clear disparity in maternal mortality between indigenous Nasa people and non-indigenous women. In 2019, the Health Department of Morales initiated a new project that aimed to guarantee satisfactory maternal health care for the Nasa. The project intended to improve maternal health care through cooperation between the government health care system and the Nasa’s traditional practices, which valued giving birth in their own community, close to family, and incorporating rituals that reflected the Nasa belief system. Development Challenge: Reducing maternal mortality. In the 42 days following...
Practitioner
Silvia Villegas is an undergraduate student studying government and public affairs at the University of the Andes in Colombia. Her case study “Reducing Maternal Mortality in an Indigenous Community in Colombia” was the wining student submission in the 2019 GDI Case Study Competition. She is part of her school’s student newspaper where she writes about the dynamics of the Colombian armed conflict in Cauca, one of Colombia’s most violent areas. She is representing Colombia as a delegate for the 2019 Intercollegiate Business Convention organized by Harvard Women in Business. She is presently formulating a socially-oriented project where aimed at helping young indigenous girls have better cognitive development.
Case study
In 2009, as Sri Lanka’s 26-year internal armed conflict was coming to an end, the Sri Lankan government requested support from the Japan International Cooperation Agency for the construction of the Manmunai Bridge, which would connect the two shores of a lagoon in the war-ravaged area of Manmunai. Development in Manmunai was a priority because the Eastern Province, where it was located, had been heavily affected by the war. With Japanese grant aid, a Japanese contractor led the construction using local workers. The project hired workers from different ethnic and linguistic groups in the community, which led to communication issues between the contractor and workers and between workers. The Japanese contractor and Sri Lankan workers perceived the division of roles differently, especially...
Practitioner
Ayumi Hori is a consultant at IC Net Limited, a Japan-based international development consulting firm that provides services on governance, health, education, agriculture, fisheries, economic development, and project evaluation. Ayumi has worked on project monitoring and evaluation and is knowledgeable about heavy industry and manufacturing. For the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), she evaluated the Manmunai Bridge construction project in eastern Sri Lanka as an ex-post evaluator, and wrote an original case study on the project. She served as a production technology and quality control expert in a JICA investment and industrial development project in Myanmar and a monitoring and evaluation expert in a JICA technical education project in Bangladesh. Previously, she worked for...
Case study
This case study examines the emergence of the Saemaul Undong Women's Association in the Republic of Korea from 1972 to 1979. This initiative was carried out as part of the Saemaul Undong (New Village Movement), a nationwide community development project. The Saemaul Undong combined top-down aspects, in that it was mandated and directed by the central govenerment, and bottom-up aspects, in that villages had broad leeway in terms of the projects that they took on at the local level. The same was true for the Saemaul Women's Associations. One important aspect of the Saemaul Undong was its encouragement of women’s leadership in village projects. In 1973, the Saemaul Women’s Association was established as a branch organization of the Saemaul Undong. After the establishment of the SWA, each...
Case study
Case Overview This case study examines the first-ever program implemented in Brazil to receive migrants from a humanitarian crisis. The humanitarian crisis in question worsened in 2010, in the wake of an earthquake that hit Haiti’s capital city, Port-au-Prince. Until 2007, Brazil had been responsible for the peacekeeping troops deployed to stabilize the Caribbean country. In 2011, the number of Haitian people crossing the border into Brazil started to rise. Traditionally very low, the inflow numbers quickly escalated to dozens, then hundreds, and finally thousands of incoming migrants. Prior to the incidents discussed in this case study, there was no public policy in place to receive and assist massive waves of immigrants coming into Brazil. For decades, the legislation had been...
Practitioner
Sing Cho (Terry) is Senior Water Supply and Sanitation Specialist in the Water GP of the World Bank in the Beijing Office, China. Since he joined the Bank in 2008, he has been responsible for managing several urban development, water supply and sanitation projects of the client countries in the Region, and contributing to the dialogues of urban development, water supply and sanitation with the clients. His experience includes project planning and development, engineering design, implementation and O&M of water supply, sanitation and solid waste. In last few years, he has been working on cross cutting issues, e.g. private public partnership, climate change (reducing methane emission).
Practitioner
Greg Power is director and co-founder of Global Partners Governance. He has been involved in political and parliamentary reform for around 20 years. Greg has worked in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, Central and Eastern Europe and Latin America. Greg’s work involves providing direct support to politicians and ministers, developing strategies and managing the process of political reform. He has also provided advice to a variety of international organisations and donor agencies helping, amongst others, the Danish foreign ministry to establish their multi-party institute, and International IDEA to evaluate their work on political parties. He writes widely on issues such as the application of political economy analysis, donor approaches to reform, and parliamentary transparency. He was...
Practitioner
Practitioner
Ms. Carvajal is a specialist in the subject of negotiation and alternative dispute resolution. She obtained her MBA with an emphasis on Marketing at the University of San Diego in California and holds a degree in Law from the University of Costa Rica. Her work over the last decade has provided her with extensive experience in the area of public service. She has specialized in Alternative Conflict Resolution Methods and is currently a member of the Centro Internacional de Arbitraje y Conciliación Comercial (International Center for Arbitration and Commercial Conciliation). She was a member of Road Safety Committee, which is led by the Fundación Internacional de Automovilismo (International Automobile Foundation). As Minister of Public Works and Transportation in Costa Rica she achieved a...
Practitioner
Omar Arias is the Practice Lead Economist of the Social Protection and Labor Global Practice and Global Lead for skills at the World Bank. Previously he was acting Sector Manager and Lead Economist in the Human Development Economics Unit for the World Bank Europe and Central Asia region; the sector leader of Human Development for Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela; a senior economist in the Poverty and Gender Group of the Latin American region; and a research economist at the Inter-American Development Bank. He has been a co-author of various analytical studies, including recent regional reports on pensions (“The Inverting Pyramid: Pension Systems Facing Demographic Challenges in Europe and Central Asia”) and jobs ("Back to Work: Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia...
Practitioner
Daria Taglioni is a lead economist in the Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of The World Bank Group and the Global Solutions Lead for Global Value Chains. Her experience in economic policy analysis covers issues of trade, international competitiveness, globalization, and the links between financial markets and trade. Prior to joining the World Bank, Daria worked at the European Central Bank, and at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. She holds a PhD in International Economics from the Graduate Institute, Geneva.
Practitioner
R. Mukami Kariuki, is currently the World Bank, Sector Manager for Urban Development and Services in East and Southern Africa; and thematic coordinator for Urban Development in Africa. An Urban and Regional Planner by training, she has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of decentralization, local capacity building, urban/regional development planning, and infrastructure and service delivery. Her work experience spans several continents and a range of urban sector priorities including slum upgrading, disaster management, local government and decentralization; it includes specialization in the water sector, including pro-poor water supply and sanitation services, local and small private service providers, services for small towns. She has written or contributed to a number of...
Practitioner
Mr. Ivan Rossignol is the Chief Technical Specialist, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of the World Bank Group. In this global role, Ivan leads the Bank knowledge and operational agenda on issues related to Growth Strategies and Competitiveness. He focuses on clusters, value chains, enclave approaches (incl. economic zones and growth poles), and growth corridors. He also leads the practice’s work on Fragile and Conflict Affected countries. Prior to his current role, he was the World Bank’s Manager for the Finance and Private Sector unit in South Asia, where his team handled issues such as the Kabul Bank crisis (Afghanistan), the India Manufacturing Growth plan, SME development (Sri Lanka). In over 20 years with the World Bank Group, Ivan has held several positions, including...
Practitioner
José Cuesta is a development economist with a Ph.D. in economics from Oxford University. He is an affiliated professor at Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy. Cuesta was previously an assistant professor in development economics at the Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands. He also worked as a research economist and social sector specialist for the Inter-American Development Bank, and as an economist for the United Nations Development Programme in Honduras. Cuesta's research interests revolve around poverty and conflict economics, specifically the distributive analysis of social policies; intra-household allocation; social protection and labor distortions. He also studies the interaction between poverty, conflict and culture. A Spanish national,...
Practitioner
William works in the World Bank's central water unit on water strategy and hydropower. From 2006 to 2012 William lived in Lao PDR, where he was Team Leader for the World Bank’s support to the Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project as well as for a hydropower and mining technical assistance project. Prior to moving to Vientiane, William worked for the World Bank’s corporate strategy group where he led a team responsible for helping senior management think about the long-term strategic challenges facing the World Bank, including developing scenarios about how the world and international development could evolve by 2020. William received a MPA from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, which he attended on a Fulbright scholarship, and also has degrees in international politics and...
Practitioner
Sumila Gulyani is currently the Global Lead for Urban Development Strategy and Analytics at the World Bank. From 2012-2014, she served as Manager for Urban Development, Water Supply and Sanitation, and Disaster Risk Management in the Europe and Central Asia Region of the World Bank. The unit’s active portfolio included 38 projects totaling US$4 billion. From 2008-2011, she was based in Kenya as Sector Leader for Sustainable Development for 6 African countries. From 2005-2007, Ms. Gulyani was at Columbia University in New York where she held the position of Assistant Professor and also served as the founding Director of the Infrastructure and Poverty Action Lab (I-PAL). Prior to that, she has held several other positions at the World Bank. Ms. Gulyani received her Ph.D. in Economic...