Agriculture

Case study

Nigeria’s National Fadama Development Project Series

The case study explores the following question: how did the Fadama project learn and adapt to changing circumstances, including the social and political context, as it evolved from a pilot program to a successful national project? In doing so, this case study traces the evolution of the project’s design and implementation to demonstrate its adaptive capacity for promoting local agriculture and rural income generation. Prior to the Fadama project, most rural projects in Nigeria were managed centrally, with decisions made at higher levels of government.

Practitioner

Carole Megevand

Carole Megevand has 20 years of professional experience in Natural Resources Management (NRM) in developing countries. She holds two Master degrees respectively on Agricultural Economics and Environment/Natural Resources Economics.

Practitioner

Paola Agostini

Dr. Paola Agostini is a Lead Environmental Economist in the World Bank’s Environment and Natural Resources Global Practice.

Practitioner

Douglas Pearce

Douglas Pearce is currently Manager in the Financial Inclusion Practice at the World Bank.

Practitioner

Meera Shekar

Meera Shekar is Global Lead for nutrition with the World Bank’s Health, Nutrition and Population Global Practice, building the World Bank’s nutrition portfolio under the “Investing in the Early Years” initiative.

Practitioner

Jose Antonio Cuesta Leiva

José Cuesta is a development economist with a Ph.D. in economics from Oxford University. He is an affiliated professor at Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy.

Case study

Building an Adaptive Team for Market Systems Development in Acholi, Uganda

This case study explores how the Revitalizing Agriculture Incomes and New Markets (RAIN) program has promoted market systems development in the Acholi region in northern Uganda. The program’s adaptation hinges on an inquisitive team, a culture of open communication, and reflective monitoring and evaluation practices.

Case study

Sustainable Urban Agriculture in Cuba

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1989 had a profound impact on Cuba’s economy. As Cuba’s main trading partner and patron (providing preferential terms for aid and above-market rates for Cuban products), the Soviet Union’s abrupt dissolution led to severe shortages of basic goods, monetary aid, and fossil fuels in Cuba. The agriculture sector was especially hard hit. Without access to Soviet machinery or fertilizer and unable to trade freely on the international market because of the U.S. trade embargo, Cuba entered a period of extended economic crisis that resulted in food rationing and rising rates of malnutrition.

Case study

How to Use Community Conditional Cash Transfers and Inter-Village Competition for Rural Development, South Korea (1970–1979)

South Korea experienced a period of rapid industrialization and economic growth in 1960-70s  when the Economic Planning Board had made a series of large-scale investments in the industrial sector and the urban areas that hosted industries. This created serious income inequality between urban and rural areas, leading to an exodus from the rural areas as villagers left to seek employment in urban areas. The unprecedented scale and chaotic nature of rural-urban migration placed a severe administrative burden on urban centers, Seoul in particular, and even threatened political and social unrest. (Brandt 1982)