Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Time allocation or task sequencing

Challenges related to insufficient/excessive duration of a component, or inappropriate timing and sequence of task.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Time allocation or task sequencing

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
In 2011, Seoul elected a new mayor who promised open government. Many of the city’s 10 million residents had grown impatient with the need to make a formal request to access public information, a requirement that impeded the development of smartphone applications that relied on updated data about city services such as public transit. To improve government transparency and encourage business growth, the Seoul Metropolitan Government opened two user-friendly online portals: Seoul Open Data Plaza and Seoul Information Communication Plaza. Through these sites, citizens have been able to access city statistics, internal approval documents, policy notes, and other public data freely and easily. To implement the new platforms, Seoul’s city government retrained city staff and reworked government...
Case study
This delivery note focuses on a conditional cash transfer program in the Philippines. Called the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, which roughly translates into “building bridges for Filipino families” the initiative, first implemented in 2007, was designed to assist the poor by directly providing them with money. Unlike conventional social assistance programs, however, the beneficiaries received the grants only if they fulfilled certain conditions. Those conditions include enrolling their children in school and ensuring that they maintain attendance rates of at least 85 percent, taking their children on regular clinic visits for basic health services (such as immunization and growth monitoring), and regularly attending sessions where the beneficiaries learned about topics such as...
Case study
This case study is one of the five winning entries from the 2019 GDI Case Study Competition. On January 12, 2010, Haiti was struck by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake, the most devastating natural disaster in the country’s recent history. On March 18, the World Bank approved a US$65 million project that combined early relief and recovery actions with long-term reconstruction planning to rebuild key Haitian institutions and infrastructure. The project faced an urgent need for action, but the application of business-as-usual processes and requirements for project preparation could have slowed the implementation of project activities needed to meet the immediate needs of Haiti after the earthquake. Moreover, in the aftermath of the earthquake, local capacity had effectively collapsed. Development...
Practitioner
Malaïka Bécoulet is a Transport Specialist in the World Bank’s Transport & Digital Development Global Practice working on rural access, sustainable mobility, and resilience. Bécoulet began working at the World Bank in 2013 focusing on rural roads and climate resilient infrastructure projects in Haiti. Prior to joining the Bank, she worked for the European Development Fund on capacity building, and before that on risk identification and mitigation in water and sanitation. Bécoulet has a Master’s in Risk Management from Sciences Po Bordeaux.  
Practitioner
Jordy Chan is a Consultant for the World Bank’s Transport & Digital Development Global Practice. He currently works on Haiti where his focus is on improving connectivity, rural accessibility, and resilience, as well as urban mobility. Prior to this position, Chan worked in outreach and partnership development for the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) in Haiti, as a Project Finance Analyst at Natixis in Paris, and as a Temporary for the World Bank focusing on improving transportation in Sub-Saharan Africa, most notably on a pilot state and peacebuilding road infrastructure project in the Central African Republic. Jordy holds a Master’s in Public Policy and Development from the Paris School of Economics and an engineering degree from Ecole des Ponts ParisTech.
Case study
In 2012, the Zambian Revenue Authority (ZRA) put together a project team to guide the development and delivery of a new electronic tax administration system, called TaxOnline, to replace an inefficient, fragmented system that relied on processing tax registrations, returns, and payments by hand, using paper forms. The revenue authority had contracted with Tata Consultancy Services, a private vendor, to develop a software system, which adapted an e-tax model built for Uganda to the Zambian system. The project team was responsible for creating blueprints to guide the developers’ work, testing the system, training internal staff and educating taxpayers, and encouraging people to embrace the new system.   Development Challenge: The primary purpose of TaxOnline was to increase the efficiency...
Practitioner
Tristan Dreisbach is a public policy consultant. Since 2014, he has worked with Innovations for Successful Societies, a research center at Princeton University. He also conducted health policy research in South Asia with Harvard University's Global Health Delivery Project. Tristan spent two years as a journalist based in Tunisia and was managing editor of Tunisia Live. Prior to that, he studied statebuilding and peacebuilding in transitioning states at New York University’s Center on International Cooperation. Tristan has an MA in Politics from New York University and did his undergraduate work at the University of Michigan.
Case study
JICA’s technical cooperation project in Kenya, “Strengthening Management for Health in Nyanza Province” (hereafter, the Project) ran from July 2009 to June 2013. Provincial and district health management teams were seen by JICA as the key to a strong health system that would improve the quality of health services for Kenyans. This delivery note explores how the Project developed the capacities of those teams. This delivery note illustrates challenges the Project faced, how they were addressed, and analyzes key factors contributing to its success. It is also noteworthy that the health management teams’ capacities that were developed by the Project have been sustained even in the face of drastic changes in Kenya’s administrative structure that occurred immediately after completion of the...
Case study
Development challenge The Strengthening Climate Resilience in the Barotse Sub-basin Project aims to strengthen Zambia’s national institutional framework for climate resilience and improve the adaptive capacity of vulnerable communities in the Barotse sub-basin of the Zambezi floodplain. Development solution To address these challenges, the project provides capacity and financial support to an interim inter-ministerial national climate change secretariat in the Ministry of National Development Planning, as well as facilitation and technical capacity building for mainstreaming climate change into local-level development plans, community decision-making, and through direct sub-project grants to communities, wards, and districts for climate adaptation measures. This has required significant...
Case study
Key Contextual Conditions Delhi, the capital of India, and a key political, cultural, and commercial hub, is one of the fastest-growing cities in the world. The population of the city is expected to reach 23 million by 2021 from the current estimated population of 13 million people. Population growth led to expansion beyond the core of the city, but the absence of rail options pushed transportation to the roads. As the population grew, traffic increased, along with associated problems such as traffic jams, pollution, and accidents. These problems were exacerbated by poor drainage systems and flooding on some stretches of road. Development Challenge Delhi’s roads have faced problems such as congestion, pollution, and increasing numbers of automobile accidents since the mid 1990s. To...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how the Three Millennium Development Goal (3MDG) project in Kayah State in Myanmar used a six-month inception period to build relationships among partners and to craft a context-tailored approach to meet the basic health needs of Kayah’s most vulnerable populations. This case study describes how the 3MDG project encouraged and supported front-line innovation and adaptive monitoring, as well as how evaluation and learning systems are built into the project’s design to enable effective programs for meaningful and sustainable reform, despite the challenges posed by demographic pressures. Development challenge: Low immunization and malnutrition among children Delivery challenge:Project design and task sequencing, stakeholder engagement, financial...
Practitioner
Practitioner
Jonathan Coony is the Global Lead for Green Competitiveness at the World Bank. He co-leads the organization’s work to support private sector in developing countries to successfully compete in growing climate-related sectors with a focus on innovation. Previously he was the Program Coordinator of the World Bank’s Climate Technology Program (CTP) at the World Bank. During his tenure, the program scaled considerably to establish a network of seven Climate Innovation Centers to support firms to innovate commercial climate solutions for local markets and grow their businesses. Over this time, the CTP brought in five donor partners with over $70 m committed. Jonathan has also worked in the World Bank energy sector. Prior to the World Bank, Jonathan worked at the International Energy Agency (IEA...
Practitioner
Bill Kingdom is the Global Lead for Water Supply and Sanitation in the Water Global Practice of the World Bank. During his career in the sector he has worked extensively in South and East Asia, the Middle East, UK, USA, and Canada. He has led urban and rural water supply and sanitation investment projects, supported regulators, provided policy advice and implemented a number of innovative PPP projects including small town and performance based leakage reduction contracts in Vietnam, wastewater operations contracts in Canada and a novel approach to deliver 24/7 water supplies in India. He has authored many papers including on the characteristics of well-run utilities, the role of aggregation in service delivery, performance based leakage control, and the challenges of measuring...
Practitioner
Emily Sinnott is a senior economist in the Human Development Economics Unit of the European and Central Asia Department of the World Bank and co-author of the flagship report "Natural Resources in Latin America and the Caribbean: Beyond Booms and Busts?" Prior to joining the World Bank she worked in the Ministry of Finance of Guyana. Emily holds a Ph.D. in economics from the European University Institute.
Practitioner
Susan Wong is the World Bank’s Global Lead for Community-Driven Development (CDD). She has led and worked on some of the largest CDD and local government programs in the world including in Indonesia, Philippines, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, India, Afghanistan, and Morocco. Her specialties are in the areas of: monitoring and evaluation, CDD and local governance, social safeguards, and operations. Susan has published on topics related to monitoring and evaluation, political economy, and community-driven development, and led one of the largest randomized impact evaluations in the world from 2007-2010 in Indonesia. Susan joined the World Bank in 2002 and has served as Social Development Program/Sector Manager, Social Development Sector Coordinator in Indonesia, and Lead Specialist. Prior to...
Practitioner
Shomik Raj Mehndiratta is a Lead Transport Specialist working in the World Bank’s Latin America and Caribbean region based in Washington DC. He is working on transport and climate issues across countries in the region. He has been at the World Bank since 2002 and in the period 2007-2010 he lived and worked in China. He is co-editor and author of an edited book on Low Carbon Urban Development in China. Prior to the World Bank he worked at CRA International, a business and economics consulting firm, based out of Boston MA. Shomik is an Indian national, and holds a PhD from the University of California at Berkeley.
Practitioner
Tara Vishwanath is a Lead Economist in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region's Poverty Reduction and Economic Management group of the World Bank. She coordinates work in the region on poverty, gender and impact evaluation. Prior to joining MENA, she led the poverty group in the South Asia region. Before joining the World Bank, she was a Professor in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University.
Practitioner
As the Global Leader for Sustainable Infrastructure and Services at the World Bank Group, Paul hopes to be able to provide value and help cities deal with their enormous challenges by successfully integrating the planning, social, technical and financial aspects of urban development. Recent changes such as large migration and extreme weather events require new and innovative solutions in the urban space. Paul has more than 20 years of experience in urban development and infrastructure projects in large, medium and small cities. He has identified, prepared and executed large-scale investment programs for the World Bank targeting urban and rural infrastructure all across the world. Over this time, he has demonstrated that providing attention to details can significantly improve results and...