Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Stakeholder engagement

Challenges stemming from failure to adequately and actively engage beneficiaries or relevant stakeholders.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Stakeholder engagement

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
The 2007–08 global economic crisis had a strong impact on the Republic of Korea and left many businesses vulnerable, especially small and medium-size enterprises. To revive the economy with business-friendly policies, the Korean government established the Presidential Council on National Competitiveness in 2008 to provide oversight and strategic direction for comprehensive regulatory reforms. The reforms prioritized deregulation of the business environment, thereby promoting investment and increasing administrative efficiency affecting business operations. To address the concerns of businesses nationwide, the council invited active private sector participation and fast-tracked regulatory changes with ground-level impact. Backed by high-level support, the council took a top-down approach...
Case study
Nestled in the Sahel, agriculture in Niger is severely impacted by climate change and scarce water resources. With temperatures rising 1.5 times faster than the global average and with daytime highs soaring above 45 degrees Celsius, subsistence farmers across Niger struggled to grow food in the scorched, sandy soil. Scarce rainwater resources, rainfall variability, and repeated prolonged dry seasons were responsible for the underutilization of available land in Niger for agriculture, and only 7 percent of land in the country was irrigated.  To test the viability and sustainability of a commercial private sector approach to supply drip irrigation technology to farmers in Niger, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) implemented the Niger Irrigation Program (NIP). With support from the...
Case study
This case study from the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) examines a project to develop a macauba-based silvopastoral system and value chain in Brazil. The project was funded in part by the CIF's Forest Investment Program (FIP) through the Multilateral Investment Fund of the Inter-American Development Bank (MIF/IDB) Lab. The macauba palm tree, native to Brazil, is a productive, oil-producing plant with high potential for biofuel production, especially in dry tropical regions. The tree yields similar oil to the African oil palm, but has several advantages. These include better resistance to drought, viability in areas without rainforest conditions, and suitability for planting in existing pastures. The macauba tree could produce oil to sustainably meet rising Brazilian and global biofuel...
Case study
Rapid urbanization and economic development in Ghana since the 1990s led to a rise in the number of informal settlements and slums. By 2010, more than half of the urban population lived in such communities, and many lacked access to public services. Most inhabitants also had little to no knowledge about their rights as citizens and had no say in the allocation of public resources. In an effort to remedy the situation, the city governments of two of the country’s biggest cities—Accra and Sekondi-Takoradi—introduced reforms in their planning and budgeting process through the IncluCity project. An international nonprofit organization named Global Communities led implementation of the project from October 2011 to September 2015.  The overarching objective was to improve participation of the...
Case study
In the 1990s, Seoul suffered from transportation problems such as traffic congestion, poor bus services, and uncoordinated transit systems. To address those issues, newly elected mayor Myung Bak Lee launched a large-scale public transportation reform program in 2004. The reforms included a new smart card run by a public-private partnership, a quasi-public transit management system, and a set of integrated distance-based fares. To manage conflicts among stakeholders such as bus and railway companies, government agencies, and civil society groups, reformers created a citizens committee that represented all parties. Seoul’s transportation reforms benefited both passengers and carriers. Bus and transit ridership increased, citizens reported higher levels of service and satisfaction, and...
Case study
In 2011, Seoul elected a new mayor who promised open government. Many of the city’s 10 million residents had grown impatient with the need to make a formal request to access public information, a requirement that impeded the development of smartphone applications that relied on updated data about city services such as public transit. To improve government transparency and encourage business growth, the Seoul Metropolitan Government opened two user-friendly online portals: Seoul Open Data Plaza and Seoul Information Communication Plaza. Through these sites, citizens have been able to access city statistics, internal approval documents, policy notes, and other public data freely and easily. To implement the new platforms, Seoul’s city government retrained city staff and reworked government...
Case study
Indonesia, a tropical country home to some of the world’s largest rainforests and peatlands, has long had a major forest fire problem. Fires occurred every year, and in 2015 forest and peatland fires scorched 2.6 million hectares of the archipelago, producing a toxic haze that blanketed the neighboring countries of Singapore and Malaysia. Thousands fell ill, and Indonesia suffered US$16 billion in economic losses. The disaster put the perpetrators of the fires—the forestry industry, palm oil industry, paper and pulp companies, and agricultural communities—in the spotlight. These actors used illegal fires to clear forests and peatland for commercial purposes, and did so with impunity. Forestry law enforcement was weak and the state agencies for fire prevention and suppression were not well...
Case study
This case study examines how BudgIT, a civic organization focused using technology for citizen engagement in Nigeria, worked to enable effective citizen monitoring of Nigeria’s public budgets, and ultimately to ensure that these budgets were effective in addressing citizens’ needs. Nigerian society faced significant challenges related to combating corruption, fostering transparency, and catalyzing civic engagement. With regard to budgets, most citizens were not very motivated to demand transparency from public officials, due to limited understanding of public finances. To address this challenge, BudgIT launched an initiative to democratize budget information and to help citizens across all literacy spans understand better the content of the national budget, especially about capital...
Case study
This delivery note examines a prominent national program in Morocco that contributed to driving the development of the country’s human capital: the National Human Development Initiative (NHDI). Launched in 2005 by King Mohammed VI, he described it as “a royal project that places the human element at the center of national policies.” The main goal of the NHDI was to address critical gaps in Morocco’s development trajectory, such as high poverty in rural areas, social exclusion in urban areas, and the lack of opportunities and resources available to vulnerable populations. It was designed to improve socioeconomic conditions in targeted poor areas through participatory local governance mechanisms. The government implemented the initiative at the level of rural and urban local governments (...
Case study
This delivery note examines how Bangladesh achieved a rapid decline in fertility despite severe economic constraints. At its independence in 1971, Bangladesh’s population growth was high, and faced with rampant poverty, the government concluded that if the population continued to increase at the same rate, it would outpace available resources. The government wanted to reduce the fertility rate and curb population growth, and managing population growth became a priority in the national policy agenda and the Planning Commission included it in its First Five-Year Plan (1973–1978). The clearest and strongest conclusion that can be drawn from the available evidence is that the country’s rapid decline in fertility, especially between 1975 and 1990, was driven primarily by the national...
Case study
When Singapore gained independence in 1959, its literacy and morbidity rates—two important measures of human capital—were similar to those of other lower-middle-income countries. In 1960, the port city-state’s per capita gross domestic product was US$428, less than the world average of US$453 and less than one-sixth that of the United States. There was little reason to expect that this small country (716 square kilometers in area) would become a world leader in the health and education of its people.  Modernizing the economy and achieving prosperity required building and harnessing Singapore’s human capital. The government charted a new path for Singapore, adopting a fast-paced industrialization strategy to create employment for an unskilled workforce and generate export earnings....
Case study
This delivery note examines the implementation of the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP). It particularly focuses on how Ghana fostered coordination among institutions and stakeholders, and how it adapted the program over time in response to evidence.  From the mid-2000s through 2014, Ghana made significant gains in measures of human capital. The school enrollment rate rose and by 2011 had exceeded the world average. The likelihood that a 15-year-old child would survive to age 60 increased as well. One important step in Ghana’s effort to develop its human capital was the GSFP. This multi-sectoral program, initiated in 2005, had multiple objectives: it was a nutrition program, an education program, and a social safety net.  The school feeding program had positive effects on learning...
Case study
Introduction Farmers in Isabela, a province in the Philippines, have long suffered from natural disasters such as flooding and drought. In recent years, climate change has made life even more difficult for farmers in the area. Droughts lasted longer, typhoons became more frequent, and the timing of seasons varied unexpectedly, making it difficult for farmers to predict rainfall. Most farmers in the region depended solely on rainfall to cultivate crops, which meant they could harvest only once a year. As a consequence, farms had low productivity, and many farmers struggled to get by. In 2009, the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA), the Republic of Korea’s international aid organization, launched the East Asia Climate Partnership (EACP), and the Philippines became a partner...
Case study
Introduction In 2012, poor students in rural Colombia were learning at levels far below their rich peers (Bos et al. 2014). Colombia needed to close the large learning gap across socioeconomic groups and regions to ensure that all students had a fair chance to realize their dreams. With the realization that limited and poor-quality educational resources were hampering learning in the most disadvantaged schools, the Colombian government sought to harness the power of information and communication technology (ICT) to provide quality education to every corner of the country. In 2012, the Colombian Ministry of National Education partnered with the Republic of Korea to launch the Building ICT in Education Capacity in Colombia project. Through this partnership, the education ministry began to...
Case study
Malabon City has long been one of the areas with the highest rates of malnutrition in the capital region of the Philippines. In 2013, 16.3 percent of children in the city were stunted, or short for their age because of low nutritional intake. Stunting causes diminished cognitive and physical development, which limits the productive capacity of children. The high stunting rate meant a huge loss in human capital potential for the city. The city’s Nutrition Office had found it difficult to reduce the incidence of malnutrition because of budgetary constraints and a lack of awareness among mothers and caregivers about proper child nutrition. In 2014, the local government started to prioritize eliminating malnutrition by drafting a comprehensive nutrition plan that involved attracting donors...
Case study
Across The Gambia, many people lack access to basic financial services that would allow them to borrow and save money. The problem is particularly prevalent in rural areas, where very few banks have branches, and as a result, most rural dwellers—particularly women—remain unbanked. Without savings or access to credit, families struggle to grow their income and improve their wellbeing. To address the problem, Irish Aid, Ireland’s international development aid organization, funded Improving Access to Pro-Poor Financial Services in Sierra Leone and The Gambia, a project launched in 2015 by the National Association of Cooperative Credit Unions of The Gambia (NACCUG) (Dalzell and O’Sullivan 2018). The initiative aimed to provide financial services to poor rural communities by helping credit...
Case study
Proper waste disposal is difficult, especially when no one wants disposal facilities in his or her neighborhood. A sound waste management plan has to consider both environmental sustainability and the wishes of the local community. In Seoul’s case, it took two decades of efforts to develop consensus on building and operating incinerators in the Republic of Korea’s capital city to dispose of residents’ waste. City officials held hundreds of open discussions to provide information on waste disposal and to listen to local residents’ concerns. Incorporating citizens’ demands, the government introduced stringent standards for pollutant emissions and related control systems, and it provided compensation to residents in the affected residential areas. At the same time that it built incinerators...
Practitioner
Ms. Miatta Zenabu Gbanya serves as the first Liberian fund manager for the Health Sector Pool Fund at the Ministry of Health in Liberia, a financing mechanism established in March 2008 to support the Ministry of Health’s National Health Policy and Plan. She has been involved in emergency preparedness and the response to cholera, meningitis, and measles outbreaks, and in 2014 served as the Deputy Incident Manager for the Ebola epidemic in Liberia. She is an active member of the Human Resources for Health Technical working group at the Ministry of Health, Liberia.  Ms. Gbanya is a registered nurse and a public health practitioner who has served on various humanitarian missions in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Sudan, and South Sudan over the last 9 years, working with Merlin and the...
Case study
In 2003, a negotiated peace ended 14 years of civil war in Liberia. The conflict had killed more than 10 percent of the prewar population and “destroyed or damaged almost all structures and institutions of the state, the economy, and everyday life” (Vinck, Pham, and Kreutzer 2011). Nearly one in two Liberians, including 45 percent of the country’s skilled workforce, had left the country (Friedman 2012), while an entire in-country generation had little access toeducation. A goal of the elected postwar government was to rebuild the civil service. In 2011, President Johnson Sirleaf promoted an expatriate corporate lawyer, Patrick Sendolo, from head of the governance and economic management assistance program to minister of lands, mining, and energy. In 2012, Minister Sendolo began a...
Case study
Through a partnership with Japan and JICA, one of the main export markets for salmon, Chile has developed a highly successful domestic salmon farming industry as a strategy to boost economic growth and alleviate poverty. By introducing new salmon farming technologies, creating a supportive legal framework, and building a global market for Chilean salmon, Chile has become the world’s second-largest salmon exporter, after Norway. However, the industry’s rapid growth has taken an environmental toll, and reforms have become necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of salmon farming as a major contributor to Chile’s economy. This delivery note analyzes some of the delivery challenges Chile has faced in growing its salmon farming industry over the last five decades.