Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Roles and responsibilities

Challenges that emerge when roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders are not clearly defined.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Roles and responsibilities

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
This case study examines how JICA and the Royal Thai Government collaborated on a project to strengthen the Multi-Disciplinary Teams approach to protect victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking is a serious human rights violation that can destroy lives, undermining families and communities while weakening the rule of law and strengthening transnational organized crime networks. Thailand is a source, destination, and transit country for men, women, and child victims of forced labor and sex trafficking. In recognition of the seriousness of the problem and the scope for increasing vulnerability in the context of both global and ASEAN community economic integration, the Royal Thai Government, local and international NGOs, and international organizations have made efforts to address...
Case study
Indonesia, a tropical country home to some of the world’s largest rainforests and peatlands, has long had a major forest fire problem. Fires occurred every year, and in 2015 forest and peatland fires scorched 2.6 million hectares of the archipelago, producing a toxic haze that blanketed the neighboring countries of Singapore and Malaysia. Thousands fell ill, and Indonesia suffered US$16 billion in economic losses. The disaster put the perpetrators of the fires—the forestry industry, palm oil industry, paper and pulp companies, and agricultural communities—in the spotlight. These actors used illegal fires to clear forests and peatland for commercial purposes, and did so with impunity. Forestry law enforcement was weak and the state agencies for fire prevention and suppression were not well...
Case study
In 2009, as Sri Lanka’s 26-year internal armed conflict was coming to an end, the Sri Lankan government requested support from the Japan International Cooperation Agency for the construction of the Manmunai Bridge, which would connect the two shores of a lagoon in the war-ravaged area of Manmunai. Development in Manmunai was a priority because the Eastern Province, where it was located, had been heavily affected by the war. With Japanese grant aid, a Japanese contractor led the construction using local workers. The project hired workers from different ethnic and linguistic groups in the community, which led to communication issues between the contractor and workers and between workers. The Japanese contractor and Sri Lankan workers perceived the division of roles differently, especially...
Practitioner
Ayumi Hori is a consultant at IC Net Limited, a Japan-based international development consulting firm that provides services on governance, health, education, agriculture, fisheries, economic development, and project evaluation. Ayumi has worked on project monitoring and evaluation and is knowledgeable about heavy industry and manufacturing. For the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), she evaluated the Manmunai Bridge construction project in eastern Sri Lanka as an ex-post evaluator, and wrote an original case study on the project. She served as a production technology and quality control expert in a JICA investment and industrial development project in Myanmar and a monitoring and evaluation expert in a JICA technical education project in Bangladesh. Previously, she worked for...
Case study
To download and read this case study, by Do-Hyun Han and Casper Hendrik Claassen, click here To read a condensed delivery note on community conditional cash transfers and the Saemaul Undong, prepared by Yoon Jung Lee, click here South Korea experienced a period of rapid industrialization and economic growth in 1960-70s  when the Economic Planning Board had made a series of large-scale investments in the industrial sector and the urban areas that hosted industries. This created serious income inequality between urban and rural areas, leading to an exodus from the rural areas as villagers left to seek employment in urban areas. The unprecedented scale and chaotic nature of rural-urban migration placed a severe administrative burden on urban centers, Seoul in particular, and even threatened...
Case study
Context Nearly half a million infants are born with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Zambia, even though the country has one of the best HIV care and treatment systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. The government provides free universal access and treatment for those who test HIV-positive, and it recently adopted an opt-out approach to routine perinatal HIV screenings. Mother-to-child transmissions in utero, at delivery, and during breastfeeding are now being diagnosed 90 percent of the time (Seidenberg et al. 2012). Diagnosing infants for HIV infections requires highly sophisticated DNA testing. The standard (antibody) test in local facilities is ineffective because of the presence of the mother’s antibodies in the infant’s bloodstream. A small blood sample is spotted onto filtered paper...
Case study
Context Fifteen years into majority rule, South Africans were not content with the pace of reforms. Millions had gained access to electricity, housing, clean water, and primary education, but the population also had grown by millions. The incumbent president was voted out of power, and the new president was met by more demonstrations in the first three months than in the prior year. President Jacob Zuma created the Ministry of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation in the Office of the President and appointed an effective Department of Public Works director as its minister. To develop a system for monitoring and improving government performance, the new minister tapped a Johannesburg city manager who had introduced private sector business principles in government and a monitoring and...
Case study
Context In the developed world, one barrier hindering the switch to mobile cash is the costly banking infrastructure—cash machines and bank branches. But in Kenya, bank branches and ATMs are few. Before 2007, Kenyans had difficulty transferring money, as there was no well-established, non-cash method for financial transactions. However, 83 percent of the population 15 years and older had mobile phones with embedded SIM cards, a technology that can facilitate many things, including payment transactions. Development Challenge Lack of a well-established, trusted, robust method other than cash for carrying out financial transactions was limiting economic activity and job creation in Kenya. For the many Kenyans who work long distances from their places of birth, the lack of an easy, cost-...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how Aflatoun International, a global network of more than 180 partner organizations in 116 countries, empowers children both socially and financially to become agents of change in their own lives and for a more equitable world. Development challenge: Limited opportunity to develop financial management skills among children Delivery challenges: Stakeholder engagement, adapting to local context, and use of evaluation data Lessons learned: 1) A key factor to Aflatoun’s success—163 nongovernmental organization partners with 62 different versions of the program in 116 countries—has been fidelity to core concepts combined with flexibility in implementation. 2) Aflatoun piloted at scale (in 10 countries), despite advice to start slowly and roll out...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how Pratham’s Read India program can help students achieve higher learning levels. Read India is based on remedial education for children who are lagging behind in basic skills such as reading and arithmetic. Through Read India, Pratham, a nongovernmental organization based in India, has demonstrated that focusing on learning outcomes and designing teaching and delivery methods to achieve higher learning outcomes can result in improved literacy and numeracy among children who attend school. This case study illustrates how Read India’s genesis and success partially lie in programmatic design components such as learning camps and Teaching at the Right Level (TaRL) but also in the program’s delivery, enabling environment, and financing. That is,...
Practitioner
Jenny Perlman Robinson is a fellow with the Brookings Institution, Center for Universal Education, where her work focuses on improving quality education and learning for children and youth in developing countries at large-scale. She is the co-author of Millions Learning: Scaling up quality education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2016) and the author of Global Compact on Learning: Taking action on education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2011). Previously, Jenny led the Women’s Refugee Commission’s work on education and youth. Prior to joining the Women’s Refugee Commission in 2003, Jenny worked on issues of women’s empowerment, human rights, and development with other non-governmental organizations, the United Nations, and the World Bank. Her fieldwork has...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how the South and Central Syria (SCS) program of Mercy Corps has supported local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations that respond to changing humanitarian needs in the midst of a war using three adaptive approaches: conflict analysis to inform programmatic response, flexible compliance procedures, and the autonomy to select teams. Development challenge: Forced displacement, conflict and civil war Delivery challenge:Skilled manpower, stakeholder engagement, roles and responsibilities Lessons learned: 1) The SCS program’s three adaptive capabilities—the internal analytical capacity provided by the Humanitarian Access Team, creative compliance methods to match partner capacity, and program autonomy to grow the...
Practitioner
Jonathan Coony is the Global Lead for Green Competitiveness at the World Bank. He co-leads the organization’s work to support private sector in developing countries to successfully compete in growing climate-related sectors with a focus on innovation. Previously he was the Program Coordinator of the World Bank’s Climate Technology Program (CTP) at the World Bank. During his tenure, the program scaled considerably to establish a network of seven Climate Innovation Centers to support firms to innovate commercial climate solutions for local markets and grow their businesses. Over this time, the CTP brought in five donor partners with over $70 m committed. Jonathan has also worked in the World Bank energy sector. Prior to the World Bank, Jonathan worked at the International Energy Agency (IEA...
Practitioner
Emily Sinnott is a senior economist in the Human Development Economics Unit of the European and Central Asia Department of the World Bank and co-author of the flagship report "Natural Resources in Latin America and the Caribbean: Beyond Booms and Busts?" Prior to joining the World Bank she worked in the Ministry of Finance of Guyana. Emily holds a Ph.D. in economics from the European University Institute.
Practitioner
Cordula Rastogi, Senior Transport Economist is one of the Global Leads on “Connecting to Markets and Opportunities”, working with the Transport and ICT and Trade and Competitiveness Global Practices. She has more than 15 years of project management experience with strong analytical skills to deliver policy-relevant solutions to clients and advise them on strategic investments and policy changes in the area of connectivity, transportation, and logistics. She has a track-record to work effectively with clients on World Bank-supported lending and non-lending transport and logistics projects in a number of countries in East Asia and Pacific, South Asia, Africa and Europe and Central Asia. Her recent work in Central Asia led to a renewed engagement with governments, including a regional...
Practitioner
Susan Wong is the World Bank’s Global Lead for Community-Driven Development (CDD). She has led and worked on some of the largest CDD and local government programs in the world including in Indonesia, Philippines, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, India, Afghanistan, and Morocco. Her specialties are in the areas of: monitoring and evaluation, CDD and local governance, social safeguards, and operations. Susan has published on topics related to monitoring and evaluation, political economy, and community-driven development, and led one of the largest randomized impact evaluations in the world from 2007-2010 in Indonesia. Susan joined the World Bank in 2002 and has served as Social Development Program/Sector Manager, Social Development Sector Coordinator in Indonesia, and Lead Specialist. Prior to...
Practitioner
R. Mukami Kariuki, is currently the World Bank, Sector Manager for Urban Development and Services in East and Southern Africa; and thematic coordinator for Urban Development in Africa. An Urban and Regional Planner by training, she has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of decentralization, local capacity building, urban/regional development planning, and infrastructure and service delivery. Her work experience spans several continents and a range of urban sector priorities including slum upgrading, disaster management, local government and decentralization; it includes specialization in the water sector, including pro-poor water supply and sanitation services, local and small private service providers, services for small towns. She has written or contributed to a number of...
Practitioner
Tara Vishwanath is a Lead Economist in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region's Poverty Reduction and Economic Management group of the World Bank. She coordinates work in the region on poverty, gender and impact evaluation. Prior to joining MENA, she led the poverty group in the South Asia region. Before joining the World Bank, she was a Professor in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University.
Practitioner
As the Global Leader for Sustainable Infrastructure and Services at the World Bank Group, Paul hopes to be able to provide value and help cities deal with their enormous challenges by successfully integrating the planning, social, technical and financial aspects of urban development. Recent changes such as large migration and extreme weather events require new and innovative solutions in the urban space. Paul has more than 20 years of experience in urban development and infrastructure projects in large, medium and small cities. He has identified, prepared and executed large-scale investment programs for the World Bank targeting urban and rural infrastructure all across the world. Over this time, he has demonstrated that providing attention to details can significantly improve results and...
Practitioner
William works in the World Bank's central water unit on water strategy and hydropower. From 2006 to 2012 William lived in Lao PDR, where he was Team Leader for the World Bank’s support to the Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project as well as for a hydropower and mining technical assistance project. Prior to moving to Vientiane, William worked for the World Bank’s corporate strategy group where he led a team responsible for helping senior management think about the long-term strategic challenges facing the World Bank, including developing scenarios about how the world and international development could evolve by 2020. William received a MPA from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, which he attended on a Fulbright scholarship, and also has degrees in international politics and...