Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Reporting and supervision

Challenges caused by obstacles in capturing relevant information and reporting it in a timely fashion.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Reporting and supervision

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
This case study (coming soon) examines UNICEF’s No Lost Generation, or Min Ila, Program, which was a cash transfer program for displaced Syrian refugee children in Lebanon. The program provided referrals to complementary services, including psychosocial support, health services, and child protection, to help alleviate barriers to education beyond income. These services aimed to target obstacles (e.g., mental and physical health, and negative coping strategies) to school attendance. Min Ila was the only child-focused social assistance program for refugee families in Lebanon at the time. It reached approximately 50,000 children over two years. The program provided case transfers on a regular basis, referrals to complementary services, and household visits. A 2018 evaluation found the...
Case study
This delivery note focuses on a conditional cash transfer program in the Philippines. Called the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, which roughly translates into “building bridges for Filipino families” the initiative, first implemented in 2007, was designed to assist the poor by directly providing them with money. Unlike conventional social assistance programs, however, the beneficiaries received the grants only if they fulfilled certain conditions. Those conditions include enrolling their children in school and ensuring that they maintain attendance rates of at least 85 percent, taking their children on regular clinic visits for basic health services (such as immunization and growth monitoring), and regularly attending sessions where the beneficiaries learned about topics such as...
Case study
This delivery note examines the implementation of the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP). It particularly focuses on how Ghana fostered coordination among institutions and stakeholders, and how it adapted the program over time in response to evidence.  From the mid-2000s through 2014, Ghana made significant gains in measures of human capital. The school enrollment rate rose and by 2011 had exceeded the world average. The likelihood that a 15-year-old child would survive to age 60 increased as well. One important step in Ghana’s effort to develop its human capital was the GSFP. This multi-sectoral program, initiated in 2005, had multiple objectives: it was a nutrition program, an education program, and a social safety net.  The school feeding program had positive effects on learning...
Case study
Since its inception in 1988, Nepal’s Female Community Health Volunteer program had helped connect people in difficult-to-reach areas to the health system, but by the 2000s the Nepali government wanted to accomplish more. Many health outcomes were still poor, including high neonatal and infant mortality, and preventable infant- and child-specific diseases were among the top 10 leading causes of death in the country. In 2008, a Nepal-based non-governmental organization called Nyaya Health Nepal began working with the national health ministry to improve health services in one Nepali district. Development Challenge: The core development challenge that Nyaya’s pilot program aimed to address was strengthening the health system. There was low utilization of available health services and the...
Case study
Through a partnership with Japan and JICA, one of the main export markets for salmon, Chile has developed a highly successful domestic salmon farming industry as a strategy to boost economic growth and alleviate poverty. By introducing new salmon farming technologies, creating a supportive legal framework, and building a global market for Chilean salmon, Chile has become the world’s second-largest salmon exporter, after Norway. However, the industry’s rapid growth has taken an environmental toll, and reforms have become necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of salmon farming as a major contributor to Chile’s economy. This delivery note analyzes some of the delivery challenges Chile has faced in growing its salmon farming industry over the last five decades.  
Practitioner
Practitioner
Case study
Context On its return to democracy in the 1990s, Chile’s economy was growing at a rapid pace. But like many countries in the region, it had chronically underinvested in infrastructure during the economic doldrums of the 1980s. Roads, ports, and highways were decades old and inadequate for the growing economic activity. Also, from 1982 to 1992, private car ownership had grown by 45 percent to a total of 1.3 million vehicles (National Institute of Statistics, various years). Congestion and traffic accidents nearly doubled during that period. The Chilean government recognized the need for significant economic investment, particularly in roads and highways, to ensure continuing economic development. However, the government did not have sufficient capital or the technical know-how to carry out...
Practitioner
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how the Revitalizing Agriculture Incomes and New Markets (RAIN) program has promoted market systems development in the Acholi region in northern Uganda. The program’s adaptation hinges on an inquisitive team, a culture of open communication, and reflective monitoring and evaluation practices. Development challenge: Low smallholder production and profitability, low agribusiness and trade performance Delivery challenge:Skilled manpower, awareness and communication strategy, reporting and supervision Lessons learned: 1) Leadership sits at the center of many of RAIN’s successes. Investments in building a collaborative, inquisitive team and promoting a culture of open communication made it possible to learn and adapt. 2) The practical effect of...
Practitioner
Ms. Carvajal is a specialist in the subject of negotiation and alternative dispute resolution. She obtained her MBA with an emphasis on Marketing at the University of San Diego in California and holds a degree in Law from the University of Costa Rica. Her work over the last decade has provided her with extensive experience in the area of public service. She has specialized in Alternative Conflict Resolution Methods and is currently a member of the Centro Internacional de Arbitraje y Conciliación Comercial (International Center for Arbitration and Commercial Conciliation). She was a member of Road Safety Committee, which is led by the Fundación Internacional de Automovilismo (International Automobile Foundation). As Minister of Public Works and Transportation in Costa Rica she achieved a...
Practitioner
Omar Arias is the Practice Lead Economist of the Social Protection and Labor Global Practice and Global Lead for skills at the World Bank. Previously he was acting Sector Manager and Lead Economist in the Human Development Economics Unit for the World Bank Europe and Central Asia region; the sector leader of Human Development for Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela; a senior economist in the Poverty and Gender Group of the Latin American region; and a research economist at the Inter-American Development Bank. He has been a co-author of various analytical studies, including recent regional reports on pensions (“The Inverting Pyramid: Pension Systems Facing Demographic Challenges in Europe and Central Asia”) and jobs ("Back to Work: Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia...
Practitioner
Daria Taglioni is a lead economist in the Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of The World Bank Group and the Global Solutions Lead for Global Value Chains. Her experience in economic policy analysis covers issues of trade, international competitiveness, globalization, and the links between financial markets and trade. Prior to joining the World Bank, Daria worked at the European Central Bank, and at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. She holds a PhD in International Economics from the Graduate Institute, Geneva.
Practitioner
R. Mukami Kariuki, is currently the World Bank, Sector Manager for Urban Development and Services in East and Southern Africa; and thematic coordinator for Urban Development in Africa. An Urban and Regional Planner by training, she has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of decentralization, local capacity building, urban/regional development planning, and infrastructure and service delivery. Her work experience spans several continents and a range of urban sector priorities including slum upgrading, disaster management, local government and decentralization; it includes specialization in the water sector, including pro-poor water supply and sanitation services, local and small private service providers, services for small towns. She has written or contributed to a number of...