Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Overambitious objectives

Challenges caused by setting targets that are unrealistically ambitious, or making the project design overly complex.

Interactive

|

Percentage of Projects with Overambitious objectives

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
This case study from the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) examines a project to develop a macauba-based silvopastoral system and value chain in Brazil. The project was funded in part by the CIF's Forest Investment Program (FIP) through the Multilateral Investment Fund of the Inter-American Development Bank (MIF/IDB) Lab. The macauba palm tree, native to Brazil, is a productive, oil-producing plant with high potential for biofuel production, especially in dry tropical regions. The tree yields similar oil to the African oil palm, but has several advantages. These include better resistance to drought, viability in areas without rainforest conditions, and suitability for planting in existing pastures. The macauba tree could produce oil to sustainably meet rising Brazilian and global biofuel...
Case study
Across The Gambia, many people lack access to basic financial services that would allow them to borrow and save money. The problem is particularly prevalent in rural areas, where very few banks have branches, and as a result, most rural dwellers—particularly women—remain unbanked. Without savings or access to credit, families struggle to grow their income and improve their wellbeing. To address the problem, Irish Aid, Ireland’s international development aid organization, funded Improving Access to Pro-Poor Financial Services in Sierra Leone and The Gambia, a project launched in 2015 by the National Association of Cooperative Credit Unions of The Gambia (NACCUG) (Dalzell and O’Sullivan 2018). The initiative aimed to provide financial services to poor rural communities by helping credit...
Case study
This study examines the expansion of the role of the producers of recyclable goods in the arena of Korean waste management between 1992 and 2010. In the late 1980s, increasing waste generation became a serious problem in Korean society. To initiate recycling activities, the producer-based Deposit Refund System (DRS) was introduced in 1992. The major feature of DRS was a combination of a deposit on sales of recyclable products with a refund upon proper recycling. The refund was expected to function as an economic incentive for increased recycling. However, under DRS the recycling performance of producers was limited because of the low deposit rate and the lack of recycling infrastructure. To overcome the shortcomings of DRS, the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) program replaced DRS...
Practitioner
Park, Sinae is PhD student in the Graduate School of Environmental Studies at Seoul National University. She received her Master’s in Urban Planning with a work titled “An exploratory study on the determinants of long lifetime of home appliances in developing countries” from the same graduate school. She served as Program Director in Resource Circulation Bureau and International Cooperation Bureau of Ministry of Environment of Republic of Korea.
Practitioner
Hong, Jong Ho is a Professor of Economics at the Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University. His teaching and research are focused on environmental economics and sustainable economy and policy. After receiving his PhD in applied economics at Cornell University, he held academic positions at Korea Development Institute (KDI) and Hanyang University in Seoul, Korea. He worked as a consultant for the World Bank and Asian Development Bank.He served as the President of Korea Environmental Economics Association and the Director of Environmental Planning Institute, Seoul National University. He currently is Vice-president of the East Asian Association of Environmental and Resource Economics, Chairman of Energy Transition Forum of Korea, Director of Asian Institute for...
Practitioner
Danny is the Centre for Public Impact’s Program Director overseeing its global activities, its research and partnerships. Danny has a particular interest in the use of evidence in policymaking and in “algorithmic” governance as well as its regulation. Previously he was a strategy consultant at The Boston Consulting Group in Berlin where he worked on digital innovation issues.
Case study
Context Driven by economic growth and rural displacement, the population of Bogotá, the capital of Colombia, grew dramatically throughout the 1990s. This rapid growth put a strain on existing transportation services, resulting in heavy congestion, excessive travel times, and elevated levels of noise and air pollution. Inner city trips—averaging an hour and 10 minutes—took place mainly by private vehicles that used 95 percent of available road space and were involved in over 52,764 accidents in 1998. Bus systems were privately owned and poorly run, with lax safety standards and uneven service routes, which discouraged the use of mass transportation. Furthermore, competition between different bus operators resulted in an oversupply of bus seats that further contributed to issues of...
Practitioner
Greg Power is director and co-founder of Global Partners Governance. He has been involved in political and parliamentary reform for around 20 years. Greg has worked in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, Central and Eastern Europe and Latin America. Greg’s work involves providing direct support to politicians and ministers, developing strategies and managing the process of political reform. He has also provided advice to a variety of international organisations and donor agencies helping, amongst others, the Danish foreign ministry to establish their multi-party institute, and International IDEA to evaluate their work on political parties. He writes widely on issues such as the application of political economy analysis, donor approaches to reform, and parliamentary transparency. He was...
Practitioner
Practitioner
Practitioner
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how Bridge International Academies, a for-profit education company founded in 2008, has developed an education model that leverages technology and scale to train and support underserved communities to deliver pre-primary (nursery and kindergarten) and primary school education. Bridge International Academies builds, staffs, and operates more than 450 low-cost private schools in marginalized communities in Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda. Development challenge: Lack of low-cost, good-quality private school education Delivery challenges: Project finance, project design, and leveraging technology Lessons learned: 1) From the beginning, Bridge International Academies has been thoughtful about what its intervention would look like and how the company...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how INJAZ—an independent Jordanian nonprofit organization founded in 1999 and specializing in youth empowerment—links the public, private, and civil society sectors to bridge the skills gap between the educational system and the changing needs of the labor market. INJAZ’s demand-driven programs serve youth from grade 7 to university level and after graduation with relevant and unique content and activities that improve students’ financial literacy, communication skills, interpersonal skills, ethical leadership, teamwork, and creative thinking skills. The programs’ learning and adaptation hinge on the volunteer-driven approach, on independent curriculum that better meets the needs of local students and local businesses, and on reflective...
Practitioner
Jenny Perlman Robinson is a fellow with the Brookings Institution, Center for Universal Education, where her work focuses on improving quality education and learning for children and youth in developing countries at large-scale. She is the co-author of Millions Learning: Scaling up quality education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2016) and the author of Global Compact on Learning: Taking action on education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2011). Previously, Jenny led the Women’s Refugee Commission’s work on education and youth. Prior to joining the Women’s Refugee Commission in 2003, Jenny worked on issues of women’s empowerment, human rights, and development with other non-governmental organizations, the United Nations, and the World Bank. Her fieldwork has...
Practitioner
R. Mukami Kariuki, is currently the World Bank, Sector Manager for Urban Development and Services in East and Southern Africa; and thematic coordinator for Urban Development in Africa. An Urban and Regional Planner by training, she has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of decentralization, local capacity building, urban/regional development planning, and infrastructure and service delivery. Her work experience spans several continents and a range of urban sector priorities including slum upgrading, disaster management, local government and decentralization; it includes specialization in the water sector, including pro-poor water supply and sanitation services, local and small private service providers, services for small towns. She has written or contributed to a number of...
Practitioner
Mr. Ivan Rossignol is the Chief Technical Specialist, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of the World Bank Group. In this global role, Ivan leads the Bank knowledge and operational agenda on issues related to Growth Strategies and Competitiveness. He focuses on clusters, value chains, enclave approaches (incl. economic zones and growth poles), and growth corridors. He also leads the practice’s work on Fragile and Conflict Affected countries. Prior to his current role, he was the World Bank’s Manager for the Finance and Private Sector unit in South Asia, where his team handled issues such as the Kabul Bank crisis (Afghanistan), the India Manufacturing Growth plan, SME development (Sri Lanka). In over 20 years with the World Bank Group, Ivan has held several positions, including...
Practitioner
William works in the World Bank's central water unit on water strategy and hydropower. From 2006 to 2012 William lived in Lao PDR, where he was Team Leader for the World Bank’s support to the Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project as well as for a hydropower and mining technical assistance project. Prior to moving to Vientiane, William worked for the World Bank’s corporate strategy group where he led a team responsible for helping senior management think about the long-term strategic challenges facing the World Bank, including developing scenarios about how the world and international development could evolve by 2020. William received a MPA from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, which he attended on a Fulbright scholarship, and also has degrees in international politics and...
Practitioner
José Cuesta is a development economist with a Ph.D. in economics from Oxford University. He is an affiliated professor at Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy. Cuesta was previously an assistant professor in development economics at the Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands. He also worked as a research economist and social sector specialist for the Inter-American Development Bank, and as an economist for the United Nations Development Programme in Honduras. Cuesta's research interests revolve around poverty and conflict economics, specifically the distributive analysis of social policies; intra-household allocation; social protection and labor distortions. He also studies the interaction between poverty, conflict and culture. A Spanish national,...