Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Inter and intra-governmental relations

Challenges caused by the difficulty of coordinating among different levels and structures of government with differing priorities and/or mismatches of resources, responsibilities, and/or expectations.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Inter and intra-governmental relations

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
The 2007–08 global economic crisis had a strong impact on the Republic of Korea and left many businesses vulnerable, especially small and medium-size enterprises. To revive the economy with business-friendly policies, the Korean government established the Presidential Council on National Competitiveness in 2008 to provide oversight and strategic direction for comprehensive regulatory reforms. The reforms prioritized deregulation of the business environment, thereby promoting investment and increasing administrative efficiency affecting business operations. To address the concerns of businesses nationwide, the council invited active private sector participation and fast-tracked regulatory changes with ground-level impact. Backed by high-level support, the council took a top-down approach...
Case study
This case study examines how JICA and the Royal Thai Government collaborated on a project to strengthen the Multi-Disciplinary Teams approach to protect victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking is a serious human rights violation that can destroy lives, undermining families and communities while weakening the rule of law and strengthening transnational organized crime networks. Thailand is a source, destination, and transit country for men, women, and child victims of forced labor and sex trafficking. In recognition of the seriousness of the problem and the scope for increasing vulnerability in the context of both global and ASEAN community economic integration, the Royal Thai Government, local and international NGOs, and international organizations have made efforts to address...
Case study
The Republic of Korea has long had a notoriously high number of pedestrian fatalities from road crashes. Part of the reason was high speed limits. The speed limit on national highways of four lanes or more was 80 kilometers per hour— even in areas where highways passed through towns or villages. After launching a plan to drastically reduce road deaths in 2015, Korea held a public contest for road safety ideas. The winning idea—dubbed “the village zone”—proposed reducing speed limits and putting in place special road signs and markings on sections of high-speed roads near population centers.  The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport adopted the idea and delegated the project to the Korea Transport Institute (KOTI), a government research institute. Implementing village zones—...
Case study
Public outcry over a series of forest fires and a ferry disaster in the 2010s prompted the government of the Republic of Korea to make public safety a top priority. From 2013 to 2017, the Korea Forest Service, the national forestry agency, developed a data-driven forest fire prediction and monitoring system to support interagency cooperation and facilitate rapid response and fire suppression. The system drew from a wide range of data to provide consistent and reliable information on the estimated risk and status of a forest fire to the public on a real-time basis. The system also supports informed decision-making by forest service officers. Despite the challenges of coordinating among agencies and ensuring data accuracy, the forest service made a series of systematic changes. The...
Case study
Kenya has long grappled with issues of improving public service delivery. In 2012, citizens could wait in queues for up to eight hours just to submit the documents required to apply for a driver’s license. To receive faster service, some citizens resorted to paying bribes. In 2013, to improve service delivery, the Ministry of Devolution and Planning launched Huduma Kenya, a one-stop shop that delivered multiple public services from one central location. The goal was to establish at least one of those one-stop shops in each of Kenya’s 47 counties within five years. During implementation, the ministry faced several challenges, including budgetary constraints, institutional resistance from other ministries and agencies, and coordination challenges with national and local government...
Case study
Indonesia, a tropical country home to some of the world’s largest rainforests and peatlands, has long had a major forest fire problem. Fires occurred every year, and in 2015 forest and peatland fires scorched 2.6 million hectares of the archipelago, producing a toxic haze that blanketed the neighboring countries of Singapore and Malaysia. Thousands fell ill, and Indonesia suffered US$16 billion in economic losses. The disaster put the perpetrators of the fires—the forestry industry, palm oil industry, paper and pulp companies, and agricultural communities—in the spotlight. These actors used illegal fires to clear forests and peatland for commercial purposes, and did so with impunity. Forestry law enforcement was weak and the state agencies for fire prevention and suppression were not well...
Case study
Facing a rise in crime and emergency situations, the Korean city of Daejeon collaborated with the national government to implement a “smart city” solution that enabled real-time information-sharing in criminal investigations and emergency response. Daejeon, the fifth-most populous city in the Republic of Korea, was the first Korean city to integrate local information and communications technology infrastructure such as municipal networks and closed-circuit televisions. Integrating municipal technology infrastructure and reorganizing related agencies presented inter-agency coordination challenges. In particular, Daejeon needed to overcome institutional barriers to enable real-time data sharing for its smart emergency response system. In 2013, Daejeon opened the Smart City Operation Center...
Case study
This case study examines how the government of Uganda implemented an output-based budgeting system. Uganda began transitioning from output-based budgeting to program-based budgeting in 2013 in a bid to improve the link between budgeting and national strategic objectives. Output-based budgets were developed to reflect the relationship between funding and expected outputs. The drawbacks of Uganda’s output-based budgeting system included unclear alignment with national development plans, insecure and tedious manual processes, inadequate data access and security controls, and incompatibility with other government budgeting systems. The program-based budgeting structure allocates resources by program or functional area, in alignment with the national development plan. Performance data inform...
Case study
This delivery note examines a prominent national program in Morocco that contributed to driving the development of the country’s human capital: the National Human Development Initiative (NHDI). Launched in 2005 by King Mohammed VI, he described it as “a royal project that places the human element at the center of national policies.” The main goal of the NHDI was to address critical gaps in Morocco’s development trajectory, such as high poverty in rural areas, social exclusion in urban areas, and the lack of opportunities and resources available to vulnerable populations. It was designed to improve socioeconomic conditions in targeted poor areas through participatory local governance mechanisms. The government implemented the initiative at the level of rural and urban local governments (...
Case study
This delivery note examines how Bangladesh achieved a rapid decline in fertility despite severe economic constraints. At its independence in 1971, Bangladesh’s population growth was high, and faced with rampant poverty, the government concluded that if the population continued to increase at the same rate, it would outpace available resources. The government wanted to reduce the fertility rate and curb population growth, and managing population growth became a priority in the national policy agenda and the Planning Commission included it in its First Five-Year Plan (1973–1978). The clearest and strongest conclusion that can be drawn from the available evidence is that the country’s rapid decline in fertility, especially between 1975 and 1990, was driven primarily by the national...
Case study
When Singapore gained independence in 1959, its literacy and morbidity rates—two important measures of human capital—were similar to those of other lower-middle-income countries. In 1960, the port city-state’s per capita gross domestic product was US$428, less than the world average of US$453 and less than one-sixth that of the United States. There was little reason to expect that this small country (716 square kilometers in area) would become a world leader in the health and education of its people.  Modernizing the economy and achieving prosperity required building and harnessing Singapore’s human capital. The government charted a new path for Singapore, adopting a fast-paced industrialization strategy to create employment for an unskilled workforce and generate export earnings....
Case study
This delivery note focuses on a conditional cash transfer program in the Philippines. Called the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, which roughly translates into “building bridges for Filipino families” the initiative, first implemented in 2007, was designed to assist the poor by directly providing them with money. Unlike conventional social assistance programs, however, the beneficiaries received the grants only if they fulfilled certain conditions. Those conditions include enrolling their children in school and ensuring that they maintain attendance rates of at least 85 percent, taking their children on regular clinic visits for basic health services (such as immunization and growth monitoring), and regularly attending sessions where the beneficiaries learned about topics such as...
Case study
This delivery note examines the implementation of the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP). It particularly focuses on how Ghana fostered coordination among institutions and stakeholders, and how it adapted the program over time in response to evidence.  From the mid-2000s through 2014, Ghana made significant gains in measures of human capital. The school enrollment rate rose and by 2011 had exceeded the world average. The likelihood that a 15-year-old child would survive to age 60 increased as well. One important step in Ghana’s effort to develop its human capital was the GSFP. This multi-sectoral program, initiated in 2005, had multiple objectives: it was a nutrition program, an education program, and a social safety net.  The school feeding program had positive effects on learning...
Case study
Following two gas explosions in 1995 that resulted from poor management of information on underground pipes, the Republic of Korea accelerated its efforts to update and integrate spatial data, such as underground maps. The Ministry of Construction and Transportation led the integration initiative, but the ministry faced a lack of cooperation from counterpart ministries and agencies. It was often at a stalemate with its main counterpart, the Ministry of Home Affairs: the two ministries could not reach a consensus over how land-related information should be collected, managed, and shared. This case study describes how the land ministry overcame these challenges by seeking mediation or windows of opportunity through higher bureaucratic channels, and by leveraging its experience and resources...
Case study
Indonesia’s nearly 260 million inhabitants live on 7,000 islands extending 5,000 kilometers east to west. The fourth most populous country, with 34 provinces and nearly 500 districts, Indonesia consistently ranks among the world’s top 10 greenhouse gas emitters. Land-use changes such as the conversion of forest cover to agriculture and the burning of forest and peat are the country’s top sources of emissions, followed by energy use and waste management. In 2007, Indonesia hosted the 13th Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and declared, along with other developing countries, its resolution to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2009, at the Group of Twenty (G20) meeting, the president of Indonesia committed the country to reducing its...
Case study
Overview In 1999, Chongqing Municipal Government initiated the Chongqing Urban Environment Project with the World Bank’s support in response to the deteriorating urban environment in the context of rapid urbanization and industrialization. In a condensed 10-year period, the Chongqing Municipal Government constructed and upgraded sustainable essential water supply, wastewater and solid waste management systems for the main urban area of the municipality to serve a population of more than six million. Removing the point source wastewater and solid waste pollution generated in the Chongqing urban area significantly mitigated environmental damage to the Yangtze River and downstream at the Three Gorges Dam. Moreover, completing these essential sustainable environmental services has been a...
Case study
Overview This case study examines the implementation of the World Bank Eco-Farming Project in Hunan, China. The project addressed the development challenge of unsustainable farming practices and environmental degradation. It introduced biogas technology into rural households often reliant on farming for their income, which delivered economic and environmental benefits by making farming practices more efficient and reducing pollution. During implementation, the Hunan Eco-Farming Project dealt with delivery challenges, including a lack of local government buy-in and capacity, low levels of participation by rural households, and poor maintenance of biogas systems after project completion. These challenges were overcome by: establishing a management system based on existing administrative...
Practitioner
Dr Peng, Shaofeng, is Associate Professor and Associate Head of the Department of Sociology, School of Public Administration, Hunan Normal University (HNU). He received his PhD degree in sociology from the School of Social and Public Administration, East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST). Dr Peng specializes in social policy rural development and poverty reduction, with particular reference to mainland China. He has a rich portfolio of academic articles and book chapters published in Chinese, reprinted by leading Chinese academic websites, including Chinese Sociology, Chinese Social Science and China Reform.
Case study
Since 2005, Incheon International Airport in the Republic of Korea was rated the best airport worldwide by Airports Council International every year. It is also rated as the world’s cleanest airport and the world’s best international transit airport by Skytrax (Skytrax 2017). As such, Korea is considered an international hub. Incheon Immigration Office is responsible for the annual inspection of more than 22 million passenger arrivals and departures. In 2004, customer satisfaction was lower than at other major airports, due in part to long wait times. As such, Korea began to look at innovating its immigration inspection process to improve customer satisfaction through more effective methods. An immigration inspection service has two primary requirements for delivering advanced inspection...
Case study
Context At the turn of the 21st century, only 30 percent of Latin American citizens had access to the Internet. In recent years, this number has doubled to 62 percent, but the gains are unevenly distributed (ITU 2015). The region still lags Europe and North America in network speeds and full mobile access. Digitally connecting the hemisphere remains one of the key challenges for Latin America to fully leverage the potential of information and communication technology (ICT) to boost productivity and enhance government efficiency. The nation of Uruguay is a notable outlier in these regional trends. In the early 2000s, the government recognized the economic and social gains from a web-connected citizenry and devised a far-reaching plan to improve the country’s mobile and Internet...