Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Financing mechanism

Challenges related to the choice of financing mechanism or instrument.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Financing mechanism

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
Nestled in the Sahel, agriculture in Niger is severely impacted by climate change and scarce water resources. With temperatures rising 1.5 times faster than the global average and with daytime highs soaring above 45 degrees Celsius, subsistence farmers across Niger struggled to grow food in the scorched, sandy soil. Scarce rainwater resources, rainfall variability, and repeated prolonged dry seasons were responsible for the underutilization of available land in Niger for agriculture, and only 7 percent of land in the country was irrigated.  To test the viability and sustainability of a commercial private sector approach to supply drip irrigation technology to farmers in Niger, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) implemented the Niger Irrigation Program (NIP). With support from the...
Case study
This case study from the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) examines the Preparing Outer Islands for Sustainable Energy Development Project (POISED) and its pioneering efforts to bring solar photovoltaic (PV)-battery-diesel hybrid energy systems to key outer island locations of Maldives and improve the efficiency of power generation. Supported by the CIF Scaling Up Renewable Energy Program in Low Income Countries (SREP) and the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the POISED project is a successful proof of concept for solar photovoltaics (PV) and battery storage in the country. Through POISED, the solar-PV- battery diesel hybrid energy systems achieved fuel savings of up to 28 percent compared to diesel-only generator sets. It makes the case that investing in renewable energy is financially sound...
Case study
This case study from the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) examines a project to develop a macauba-based silvopastoral system and value chain in Brazil. The project was funded in part by the CIF's Forest Investment Program (FIP) through the Multilateral Investment Fund of the Inter-American Development Bank (MIF/IDB) Lab. The macauba palm tree, native to Brazil, is a productive, oil-producing plant with high potential for biofuel production, especially in dry tropical regions. The tree yields similar oil to the African oil palm, but has several advantages. These include better resistance to drought, viability in areas without rainforest conditions, and suitability for planting in existing pastures. The macauba tree could produce oil to sustainably meet rising Brazilian and global biofuel...
Case study
When Singapore gained independence in 1959, its literacy and morbidity rates—two important measures of human capital—were similar to those of other lower-middle-income countries. In 1960, the port city-state’s per capita gross domestic product was US$428, less than the world average of US$453 and less than one-sixth that of the United States. There was little reason to expect that this small country (716 square kilometers in area) would become a world leader in the health and education of its people.  Modernizing the economy and achieving prosperity required building and harnessing Singapore’s human capital. The government charted a new path for Singapore, adopting a fast-paced industrialization strategy to create employment for an unskilled workforce and generate export earnings....
Case study
Development challenge: Using renewable energy to provide sustainable, affordable, and reliable supply of electricity Thailand’s energy security is at risk from rapid increases in energy demand, the increasing scarcity of domestic fossil fuel resources, and uncertainty surrounding the reliability and costs of energy imports. Energy security has therefore long been a top priority for Thailand. Despite this, when the project was developed, solar and wind renewable energy had not yet been developed at scale, and the market had limited experience with project financing for the renewable sector. Development solution: Development of private sector wind power projects under the Thai government Small and Very Small Producers program to increase renewable energy supply and de-risk project...
Case study
Development challenge: Secure a reliable, sustainable, and affordable power supply to meet current and future demand. Kenya’s electricity supply has long been heavily dependent on large hydropower, accounting for almost half of the country’s installed capacity. It has become increasingly unreliable due to climate change impacts and short-term, high-cost, fossil-fueled thermal generation. Moreover, Kenya has not yet been able to meet its rapidly growing demand for energy. Development solution: Increase renewable energy supply by generating geothermal energy at an affordable cost in appropriate public-private partnerships. Kenya has significant geothermal resources, estimated between 7,000 to 10,000 megawatts (MW). Its National Energy Policy set an ambitious goal of moving from 660 MW of...
Case study
This case study examines the Republic of Korea’s Rural Electrification Project, which was carried out by the Korean government and Korea Electricity Power Corporation (KEPCO) between 1970 and 1987. The main purpose of this project was to achieve the nationwide electrification by offering long-term, low-interest loans. These loans were to be used for the construction of distribution facilities to rural residents who were regionally and financially disadvantaged, and not on large-scale transmission facilities, which would diminish return on investments. The Rural Electrification Project was a pioneering project intended to upgrade the education, culture, health, and hygiene in these areas, and was designed to develop the economy by increasing the productivity of these rural residents. As...
Case study
To download and read this case study, by Do-Hyun Han and Casper Hendrik Claassen, click here To read a condensed delivery note on community conditional cash transfers and the Saemaul Undong, prepared by Yoon Jung Lee, click here South Korea experienced a period of rapid industrialization and economic growth in 1960-70s  when the Economic Planning Board had made a series of large-scale investments in the industrial sector and the urban areas that hosted industries. This created serious income inequality between urban and rural areas, leading to an exodus from the rural areas as villagers left to seek employment in urban areas. The unprecedented scale and chaotic nature of rural-urban migration placed a severe administrative burden on urban centers, Seoul in particular, and even threatened...
Case study
Context The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations (GAVI) is an international organization and public–private partnership that was created to improve immunization rates around the world. GAVI was launched in January 2000 to address a growing disparity in medical coverage between the developed and developing worlds. At the time, more than 30 million children in developing countries did not receive routine immunizations against life-threatening diseases such as polio, diphtheria, tuberculosis, pertussis, and measles. Those diseases had been nearly eradicated in the developed world but continued to produce nearly 3 million premature deaths per year in the world’s poorest countries (UNICEF 2000). The high cost of vaccines, lack of research, and inadequate supply chains for new drugs...
Case study
Context Two cyclones ravaged the island of Madagascar, which created a food crisis. To bolster its depleted stocks of rice, a staple food responsible for providing Malagasy with most of their nutritional needs, the government applied a “Rapid Results” project management methodology with great success. The method focuses on rallying government, civil society, and private sector officials to achieve common goals under tight deadlines, usually in less than five months. Development Challenge In 2004, the island of Madagascar suffered two major cyclones, Cyclone Elita and Cyclone Gafila, which together damaged nearly a third of Madagascar’s riceproducing fields and wiped out an estimated 10 percent of national production. At the same time, Madagascar could not import enough rice to make up for...
Practitioner
Danny is the Centre for Public Impact’s Program Director overseeing its global activities, its research and partnerships. Danny has a particular interest in the use of evidence in policymaking and in “algorithmic” governance as well as its regulation. Previously he was a strategy consultant at The Boston Consulting Group in Berlin where he worked on digital innovation issues.
Case study
Context Driven by economic growth and rural displacement, the population of Bogotá, the capital of Colombia, grew dramatically throughout the 1990s. This rapid growth put a strain on existing transportation services, resulting in heavy congestion, excessive travel times, and elevated levels of noise and air pollution. Inner city trips—averaging an hour and 10 minutes—took place mainly by private vehicles that used 95 percent of available road space and were involved in over 52,764 accidents in 1998. Bus systems were privately owned and poorly run, with lax safety standards and uneven service routes, which discouraged the use of mass transportation. Furthermore, competition between different bus operators resulted in an oversupply of bus seats that further contributed to issues of...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how Worldreader’s digital reading program, implemented by international and local partner nongovernmental organizations, provides children and their families in 53 countries access to culturally and linguistically relevant digital books. Development challenge: Lack of access to texts, specifically because of the shortage of books Delivery challenges: Project design, project finance, and stakeholder engagement Lessons learned: 1) To improve literacy, Worldreader focused on creating a culture of reading by leveraging technology to provide access to more than 30,000 books via low-cost e-readers and mobile reading applications that could be used by students, teachers, and families. 2) Investing in teacher training not only helped garner crucial...
Practitioner
Jenny Perlman Robinson is a fellow with the Brookings Institution, Center for Universal Education, where her work focuses on improving quality education and learning for children and youth in developing countries at large-scale. She is the co-author of Millions Learning: Scaling up quality education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2016) and the author of Global Compact on Learning: Taking action on education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2011). Previously, Jenny led the Women’s Refugee Commission’s work on education and youth. Prior to joining the Women’s Refugee Commission in 2003, Jenny worked on issues of women’s empowerment, human rights, and development with other non-governmental organizations, the United Nations, and the World Bank. Her fieldwork has...
Practitioner
Mr. Ivan Rossignol is the Chief Technical Specialist, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of the World Bank Group. In this global role, Ivan leads the Bank knowledge and operational agenda on issues related to Growth Strategies and Competitiveness. He focuses on clusters, value chains, enclave approaches (incl. economic zones and growth poles), and growth corridors. He also leads the practice’s work on Fragile and Conflict Affected countries. Prior to his current role, he was the World Bank’s Manager for the Finance and Private Sector unit in South Asia, where his team handled issues such as the Kabul Bank crisis (Afghanistan), the India Manufacturing Growth plan, SME development (Sri Lanka). In over 20 years with the World Bank Group, Ivan has held several positions, including...
Practitioner
José Cuesta is a development economist with a Ph.D. in economics from Oxford University. He is an affiliated professor at Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy. Cuesta was previously an assistant professor in development economics at the Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands. He also worked as a research economist and social sector specialist for the Inter-American Development Bank, and as an economist for the United Nations Development Programme in Honduras. Cuesta's research interests revolve around poverty and conflict economics, specifically the distributive analysis of social policies; intra-household allocation; social protection and labor distortions. He also studies the interaction between poverty, conflict and culture. A Spanish national,...
Practitioner
William works in the World Bank's central water unit on water strategy and hydropower. From 2006 to 2012 William lived in Lao PDR, where he was Team Leader for the World Bank’s support to the Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project as well as for a hydropower and mining technical assistance project. Prior to moving to Vientiane, William worked for the World Bank’s corporate strategy group where he led a team responsible for helping senior management think about the long-term strategic challenges facing the World Bank, including developing scenarios about how the world and international development could evolve by 2020. William received a MPA from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, which he attended on a Fulbright scholarship, and also has degrees in international politics and...