Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Corruption and patronage

Challenges stemming from the abuse of public power for private gain and/or favoritism toward patrons/clients/associates.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Corruption and patronage

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
Indonesia, a tropical country home to some of the world’s largest rainforests and peatlands, has long had a major forest fire problem. Fires occurred every year, and in 2015 forest and peatland fires scorched 2.6 million hectares of the archipelago, producing a toxic haze that blanketed the neighboring countries of Singapore and Malaysia. Thousands fell ill, and Indonesia suffered US$16 billion in economic losses. The disaster put the perpetrators of the fires—the forestry industry, palm oil industry, paper and pulp companies, and agricultural communities—in the spotlight. These actors used illegal fires to clear forests and peatland for commercial purposes, and did so with impunity. Forestry law enforcement was weak and the state agencies for fire prevention and suppression were not well...
Case study
In 2003, a negotiated peace ended 14 years of civil war in Liberia. The conflict had killed more than 10 percent of the prewar population and “destroyed or damaged almost all structures and institutions of the state, the economy, and everyday life” (Vinck, Pham, and Kreutzer 2011). Nearly one in two Liberians, including 45 percent of the country’s skilled workforce, had left the country (Friedman 2012), while an entire in-country generation had little access toeducation. A goal of the elected postwar government was to rebuild the civil service. In 2011, President Johnson Sirleaf promoted an expatriate corporate lawyer, Patrick Sendolo, from head of the governance and economic management assistance program to minister of lands, mining, and energy. In 2012, Minister Sendolo began a...
Case study
Context Electric power supply and demand had been mismatched in South Africa for several decades when the postapartheid government introduced formal planning in the energy sector and required significant renewables in the power generation mix. Electricity planning (formally named the Integrated Resource Plan) was moved from a state-owned public utility with a monopoly on power generation, Askom, to the Department of Energy. Whereas new energy policies broached private-sector participation in renewable energy (a 1998 agreement called for 70:30 public-private power generation) and modest renewable energy targets for 2003–13, implementation floundered. Policy and regulatory frameworks were untimely; procurement programs designed by Askom were mostly unsuccessful; and targets were not clearly...
Case study
Context Cape Town is a metropolis of deep biodiversity and diverse demographics. Of its residents, 48 percent are mixed race or "colored," 32 percent are black, and 20 percent are white or Asian. The Cape Floristic Region nurtures more than half the world’s flora, fauna, birds, and beasts. But South Africa’s second-largest city, by 2006, had lost nearly three-quarters of its natural habitat and about 95 percent of its revenue stream. For every house built, 50 families were left waiting. The city averaged six murders per day (City of Cape Town 2006). Years of fast-changing coalitions had fostered revolving-door governments. Gradually, seven local authorities absorbed the 35 apartheid-era municipalities and instituted cross-subsidizing ("Unicity"). The buildout of infrastructure and...
Case study
Context The Alexandria governorate’s capital, also name Alexandria, is the second largest city in the Arab Republic of Egypt and has a rich history. More than 95 percent of the governorate’s population of about 3.8 million lives in the city, and the region houses 40 percent of all industrial activity in Egypt. By 1997, Alexandria’s infrastructure, services, and economy were in serious decline after decades of low investment in roads and bridges, water and sanitation systems, and electricity and transportation networks. Citizens lacked adequate access to education and health. Heavy traffic clogged the city. Nearly a third of residents, including more than a million in 40 squatter settlements, had limited access to water, electricity, and sanitation. Sanitation pipes spewed more than a...
Practitioner
Greg Power is director and co-founder of Global Partners Governance. He has been involved in political and parliamentary reform for around 20 years. Greg has worked in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, Central and Eastern Europe and Latin America. Greg’s work involves providing direct support to politicians and ministers, developing strategies and managing the process of political reform. He has also provided advice to a variety of international organisations and donor agencies helping, amongst others, the Danish foreign ministry to establish their multi-party institute, and International IDEA to evaluate their work on political parties. He writes widely on issues such as the application of political economy analysis, donor approaches to reform, and parliamentary transparency. He was...
Practitioner
Niels Holm-Nielsen is Regional Coordinator for Disaster Risk Management in Latin America and the Caribbean for the World Bank. Niels joined the Latin America group as a Disaster Risk Management specialist in 2008 from MENA. He has in the past couple of years led the Disaster Risk Management program in Colombia and the Caribbean, leading the preparation and Board approval of several DRM Investment operations, Emergency Recovery Operations, and a Cat DDO, in addition to a large portfolio of grant funded projects. In MENA he worked on water management, climate adaptation, and disaster risk management operations in Iran, Jordan and Yemen. Before joining the World Bank he worked for the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) for five years, where he helped create the corporate policy on...
Practitioner
Doyle Gallegos is the World Bank's Lead ICT Policy Specialist. In this role, Mr. Gallegos leads the Bank’s telecommunications policy and regulatory agenda, regional backbone and rural connectivity programs, and implementation of PPPs in client countries. Prior to joining the World Bank he worked as a consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton as a Senior Advisor and as a Senior Manager in Deloitte Consulting throughout the Middle East, Latin America, Europe, and US. Mr. Gallegos also has held VP level positions with telecom start-up and emerging business enterprises. Mr. Gallegos has an MBA in Finance from the Wharton School and an undergraduate degree in Economics from Columbia University.
Practitioner
As Practice Manager in the Social Protection, Labor and Jobs Global Practice, Hana Brixi leads the engagement in the MNA region. Prior to this position, she led the Global Solutions Group on Public Service Delivery in the Governance Global Practice, and served as Program Leader for the Gulf countries and Lead Economist for Human Development in the MNA region. In her career, Hana has been advancing World Bank engagement on human development, governance and public finance especially in the MNA, East Asia and Europe & Central Asia regions. Based in China during 2001-10, she also served as World Health Organization’s Coordinator for Health Sector Development and UNICEF Social Policy Chief, and she taught as a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, School of Public Policy and...
Practitioner
Maitreyi Bordia Das is the World Bank's Global Lead for Social Inclusion. Based in Washington DC, she works on issues of inequality and exclusion and on the design and implementation of social policy and programs. Among other publications, Maitreyi is also the lead author of the 2013 report, "Inclusion Matters: The Foundation for Shared Prosperity"​ and most recently of "Scaling the Heights: Social Inclusion and Sustainable Development in Himachal Pradesh"​. She started her career as a lecturer in St Stephen's College, University of Delhi, has been a MacArthur Fellow at the Harvard Center of Population and Development Studies and worked as advisor to the United Nations Development Program. She has a PhD in Sociology (Demography) from the University of...
Practitioner
Jonathan Coony is the Global Lead for Green Competitiveness at the World Bank. He co-leads the organization’s work to support private sector in developing countries to successfully compete in growing climate-related sectors with a focus on innovation. Previously he was the Program Coordinator of the World Bank’s Climate Technology Program (CTP) at the World Bank. During his tenure, the program scaled considerably to establish a network of seven Climate Innovation Centers to support firms to innovate commercial climate solutions for local markets and grow their businesses. Over this time, the CTP brought in five donor partners with over $70 m committed. Jonathan has also worked in the World Bank energy sector. Prior to the World Bank, Jonathan worked at the International Energy Agency (IEA...
Practitioner
Emily Sinnott is a senior economist in the Human Development Economics Unit of the European and Central Asia Department of the World Bank and co-author of the flagship report "Natural Resources in Latin America and the Caribbean: Beyond Booms and Busts?" Prior to joining the World Bank she worked in the Ministry of Finance of Guyana. Emily holds a Ph.D. in economics from the European University Institute.
Practitioner
Bill Kingdom is the Global Lead for Water Supply and Sanitation in the Water Global Practice of the World Bank. During his career in the sector he has worked extensively in South and East Asia, the Middle East, UK, USA, and Canada. He has led urban and rural water supply and sanitation investment projects, supported regulators, provided policy advice and implemented a number of innovative PPP projects including small town and performance based leakage reduction contracts in Vietnam, wastewater operations contracts in Canada and a novel approach to deliver 24/7 water supplies in India. He has authored many papers including on the characteristics of well-run utilities, the role of aggregation in service delivery, performance based leakage control, and the challenges of measuring...
Practitioner
Susan Wong is the World Bank’s Global Lead for Community-Driven Development (CDD). She has led and worked on some of the largest CDD and local government programs in the world including in Indonesia, Philippines, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, India, Afghanistan, and Morocco. Her specialties are in the areas of: monitoring and evaluation, CDD and local governance, social safeguards, and operations. Susan has published on topics related to monitoring and evaluation, political economy, and community-driven development, and led one of the largest randomized impact evaluations in the world from 2007-2010 in Indonesia. Susan joined the World Bank in 2002 and has served as Social Development Program/Sector Manager, Social Development Sector Coordinator in Indonesia, and Lead Specialist. Prior to...
Practitioner
Tara Vishwanath is a Lead Economist in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region's Poverty Reduction and Economic Management group of the World Bank. She coordinates work in the region on poverty, gender and impact evaluation. Prior to joining MENA, she led the poverty group in the South Asia region. Before joining the World Bank, she was a Professor in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University.
Practitioner
Shomik Raj Mehndiratta is a Lead Transport Specialist working in the World Bank’s Latin America and Caribbean region based in Washington DC. He is working on transport and climate issues across countries in the region. He has been at the World Bank since 2002 and in the period 2007-2010 he lived and worked in China. He is co-editor and author of an edited book on Low Carbon Urban Development in China. Prior to the World Bank he worked at CRA International, a business and economics consulting firm, based out of Boston MA. Shomik is an Indian national, and holds a PhD from the University of California at Berkeley.
Practitioner
As the Global Leader for Sustainable Infrastructure and Services at the World Bank Group, Paul hopes to be able to provide value and help cities deal with their enormous challenges by successfully integrating the planning, social, technical and financial aspects of urban development. Recent changes such as large migration and extreme weather events require new and innovative solutions in the urban space. Paul has more than 20 years of experience in urban development and infrastructure projects in large, medium and small cities. He has identified, prepared and executed large-scale investment programs for the World Bank targeting urban and rural infrastructure all across the world. Over this time, he has demonstrated that providing attention to details can significantly improve results and...
Practitioner
Ms. Carvajal is a specialist in the subject of negotiation and alternative dispute resolution. She obtained her MBA with an emphasis on Marketing at the University of San Diego in California and holds a degree in Law from the University of Costa Rica. Her work over the last decade has provided her with extensive experience in the area of public service. She has specialized in Alternative Conflict Resolution Methods and is currently a member of the Centro Internacional de Arbitraje y Conciliación Comercial (International Center for Arbitration and Commercial Conciliation). She was a member of Road Safety Committee, which is led by the Fundación Internacional de Automovilismo (International Automobile Foundation). As Minister of Public Works and Transportation in Costa Rica she achieved a...
Practitioner
Omar Arias is the Practice Lead Economist of the Social Protection and Labor Global Practice and Global Lead for skills at the World Bank. Previously he was acting Sector Manager and Lead Economist in the Human Development Economics Unit for the World Bank Europe and Central Asia region; the sector leader of Human Development for Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela; a senior economist in the Poverty and Gender Group of the Latin American region; and a research economist at the Inter-American Development Bank. He has been a co-author of various analytical studies, including recent regional reports on pensions (“The Inverting Pyramid: Pension Systems Facing Demographic Challenges in Europe and Central Asia”) and jobs ("Back to Work: Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia...