Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Bureaucratic structure

Administrative barriers or bureaucratic structures that impede and/or slow down coordination or engagements.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Bureaucratic structure

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
This case study examines how JICA and the Royal Thai Government collaborated on a project to strengthen the Multi-Disciplinary Teams approach to protect victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking is a serious human rights violation that can destroy lives, undermining families and communities while weakening the rule of law and strengthening transnational organized crime networks. Thailand is a source, destination, and transit country for men, women, and child victims of forced labor and sex trafficking. In recognition of the seriousness of the problem and the scope for increasing vulnerability in the context of both global and ASEAN community economic integration, the Royal Thai Government, local and international NGOs, and international organizations have made efforts to address...
Case study
This case study examines regional development in Indonesia. For decades, economic development efforts by the national government centered on the island of Java, exacerbating unequal development on the other islands, including Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. To address the issue, the Indonesian government established Special Economic Zones (SEZ, or in Indonesian: Kawasan Ekonomi Khusus, KEK). However, efforts to promote business development within the SEZs faced two challenges: overly complex bureaucracy and lack of basic infrastructure. In response, the government established integrated one-stop service centers to handle all required business actions. In addition, the central and local governments worked together with SEZ operators to build critical infrastructure. As a result,...
Case study
Facing a rise in crime and emergency situations, the Korean city of Daejeon collaborated with the national government to implement a “smart city” solution that enabled real-time information-sharing in criminal investigations and emergency response. Daejeon, the fifth-most populous city in the Republic of Korea, was the first Korean city to integrate local information and communications technology infrastructure such as municipal networks and closed-circuit televisions. Integrating municipal technology infrastructure and reorganizing related agencies presented inter-agency coordination challenges. In particular, Daejeon needed to overcome institutional barriers to enable real-time data sharing for its smart emergency response system. In 2013, Daejeon opened the Smart City Operation Center...
Case study
To read the case study in English, click here Para leer el estudio de caso en español, oprima aquí Este estudio de caso se centra en el proceso de desarrollo de la Red Federal de Cardiopatías Congénitas (RFCC) en Argentina. Las cardiopatías congénitas (CCs) son defectos cardíacos congénitos presentes al nacer que, si no son detectadas y tratadas a tiempo, pueden ocasionar la muerte del paciente. A principio de la década del 2000, las CCs se convirtieron en una prioridad dentro del sistema de salud argentino como una de las estrategias orientadas a reducir la mortalidad infantil. Además de la falta de capacidad prestacional con respecto a la demanda total, el principal desafío fue el de superar la fragmentación del sistema de salud dentro del marco federal de Argentina. Esta fragmentación...
Case study
Para leer el estudio de caso en español, oprima aquí To read the case study in English, click here This case study examines how Argentina developed a nationwide network for the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects (CHDs) for infants and children without access to health coverage. CHDs are anomalies in the structure of the heart that are present at birth, and can lead to death if not detected and addressed with surgery in time. By the mid-2000s, CHDs had become an important priority for Argentinean health authorities, as part of their strategy to further lower infant mortality rates.  The case study begins by describing the situation in terms of CHD diagnosis and care before the implementation of the CHD Federal Network (FNCHD) and the factors that prompted national and...
Case study
In Kerala, the southernmost state of India, an increasingly high burden of obesity and non-communicable diseases (NCDs), posed a significant challenge to the state’s human development. The Kerala government responded to this challenge with a multipronged approach. In 2010, it was one of the first states in India to adopt the national program for control of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke (NPCDCS) on a limited basis, and later expanded it to the whole state using its own financial resources. Early diagnosis, treatment, and behavior change were the corner stones of this program. In 2016, it launched a new program through local governments to encourage lifestyle modifications in the population. The latest intervention by the government was the introduction of the “Fat...
Practitioner
Ximing Zhang is a Senior Dams Specialist working in the World Bank’s Water Global Practice. He has been working on dam safety management, irrigation and agricultural development, flood and watershed management in globally. He has been working at the World Bank since 2005 and has held different corporate and regional assignment, including in the East Asia Pacific Region, South Asia Region, Africa Region, Latin American and Carrabin Region and Europe and Central Asia Region, etc. Prior to joining the World Bank, he worked at the Ministry of Water Resources in China. Ximing holds degrees in Hydropower Engineering, Hydraulics and Business Administration in Finance from Tsinghua University, Leeds University and Maryland University.
Practitioner
Sing Cho (Terry) is Senior Water Supply and Sanitation Specialist in the Water GP of the World Bank in the Beijing Office, China. Since he joined the Bank in 2008, he has been responsible for managing several urban development, water supply and sanitation projects of the client countries in the Region, and contributing to the dialogues of urban development, water supply and sanitation with the clients. His experience includes project planning and development, engineering design, implementation and O&M of water supply, sanitation and solid waste. In last few years, he has been working on cross cutting issues, e.g. private public partnership, climate change (reducing methane emission).
Case study
Overview This case study documents how the Government of Shaanxi Province provided sustainable and safe water supply, and improved sanitation and hygiene in poor rural communities. The Shaanxi Provincial Government introduced the Rural Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion Project in 2008 with the goal of addressing the lack of safe drinking water and sanitation facilities in poor rural areas. To overcome this, the project would have to change deep-seated behaviors, as villagers often did not follow sanitary practices, and overcome issues of organizational coordination, as government departments often did not cooperate on complementary issues of water supply and sanitation. The case study focuses on how the project was implemented utilizing a participatory “three-in-one” strategy...
Case study
Overview Jiangxi Province, on the southern bank of the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, is one of China’s largest agricultural producers. However, Jiangxi is characterized by uneven and slow rural development, rough agricultural production techniques, and low income among farmers. In recent years, productivity has suffered from bottlenecks in agricultural infrastructure, a lack of access to market, and inadequate production technology and technical knowledge and capabilities among farmers. In 2004 the province proposed a large-scale agricultural project to improve rural and agricultural development in the province, focusing on water conservation, irrigation, drainage infrastructure, agricultural productivity, and market systems. This case study looks at the Chinese Government’s...
Case study
This case study examines the Republic of Korea’s reforestation policy between 1973 and 1987, with a focus on the introduction of the tree monitoring system. The tree monitoring system is one of a number of policies that contributed to successful forest reclamation projects, and has been evaluated as improving the survival rate of seedlings in plantations and increasing the responsibility and morale of forestry officers. This study analyzes the background, objectives, implementation processes, results, effects, and success factors of this system.  To download and read this case study, by Kyung Joon Lee, click here.   To read a condensed delivery note, prepared by Jacob Bathanti, click here. Development Challenge The Republic of Korea has been struggling with the issue of deforestation...
Case study
Context New technologies disrupt and reshape the private sector daily. But new technologies also are quietly transforming government by bringing fiscal efficiencies to public monies and providing citizens with faster, user-friendly services. In the United Arab Emirates, modern management practices converged iteratively with high-tech applications and resulted in a national identification management program and a cutting-edge electronic identification (eID) card for each citizen and legal resident. The new digital infrastructure pulled together three separate elements in the Emirates: the government’s role in society was expanding; high-tech systems that were organizational were driving public institutions; and the country, which lacked a population registry, had a workforce comprising 90...
Case study
Context In Kenya, access to education has been uneven. In the two decades after independence, the country made steady progress toward equal education opportunities. In the 1990s, this trend reversed significantly as the costs of education were largely pushed from the government to households. By the 2002 presidential elections, the opposition party ran on a platform of universal primary education, among other issues, and won the election. International donors, long absent because of poor governance and systemic corruption, reengaged in the education sector. Free primary education was rolled out in 2003. The policy allowed children to be admitted without charge and banned all levies. It lifted the biggest constraint to attending school—household cash outlays for school fees; yet households...
Case study
Context Two cyclones ravaged the island of Madagascar, which created a food crisis. To bolster its depleted stocks of rice, a staple food responsible for providing Malagasy with most of their nutritional needs, the government applied a “Rapid Results” project management methodology with great success. The method focuses on rallying government, civil society, and private sector officials to achieve common goals under tight deadlines, usually in less than five months. Development Challenge In 2004, the island of Madagascar suffered two major cyclones, Cyclone Elita and Cyclone Gafila, which together damaged nearly a third of Madagascar’s riceproducing fields and wiped out an estimated 10 percent of national production. At the same time, Madagascar could not import enough rice to make up for...
Case study
Context The Alexandria governorate’s capital, also name Alexandria, is the second largest city in the Arab Republic of Egypt and has a rich history. More than 95 percent of the governorate’s population of about 3.8 million lives in the city, and the region houses 40 percent of all industrial activity in Egypt. By 1997, Alexandria’s infrastructure, services, and economy were in serious decline after decades of low investment in roads and bridges, water and sanitation systems, and electricity and transportation networks. Citizens lacked adequate access to education and health. Heavy traffic clogged the city. Nearly a third of residents, including more than a million in 40 squatter settlements, had limited access to water, electricity, and sanitation. Sanitation pipes spewed more than a...
Practitioner
Greg Power is director and co-founder of Global Partners Governance. He has been involved in political and parliamentary reform for around 20 years. Greg has worked in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, Central and Eastern Europe and Latin America. Greg’s work involves providing direct support to politicians and ministers, developing strategies and managing the process of political reform. He has also provided advice to a variety of international organisations and donor agencies helping, amongst others, the Danish foreign ministry to establish their multi-party institute, and International IDEA to evaluate their work on political parties. He writes widely on issues such as the application of political economy analysis, donor approaches to reform, and parliamentary transparency. He was...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how Pratham’s Read India program can help students achieve higher learning levels. Read India is based on remedial education for children who are lagging behind in basic skills such as reading and arithmetic. Through Read India, Pratham, a nongovernmental organization based in India, has demonstrated that focusing on learning outcomes and designing teaching and delivery methods to achieve higher learning outcomes can result in improved literacy and numeracy among children who attend school. This case study illustrates how Read India’s genesis and success partially lie in programmatic design components such as learning camps and Teaching at the Right Level (TaRL) but also in the program’s delivery, enabling environment, and financing. That is,...
Practitioner
Jenny Perlman Robinson is a fellow with the Brookings Institution, Center for Universal Education, where her work focuses on improving quality education and learning for children and youth in developing countries at large-scale. She is the co-author of Millions Learning: Scaling up quality education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2016) and the author of Global Compact on Learning: Taking action on education in developing countries (Brookings Institution 2011). Previously, Jenny led the Women’s Refugee Commission’s work on education and youth. Prior to joining the Women’s Refugee Commission in 2003, Jenny worked on issues of women’s empowerment, human rights, and development with other non-governmental organizations, the United Nations, and the World Bank. Her fieldwork has...
Case study
Case Study in brief: This case study explores how the Three Millennium Development Goal (3MDG) project in Kayah State in Myanmar used a six-month inception period to build relationships among partners and to craft a context-tailored approach to meet the basic health needs of Kayah’s most vulnerable populations. This case study describes how the 3MDG project encouraged and supported front-line innovation and adaptive monitoring, as well as how evaluation and learning systems are built into the project’s design to enable effective programs for meaningful and sustainable reform, despite the challenges posed by demographic pressures. Development challenge: Low immunization and malnutrition among children Delivery challenge:Project design and task sequencing, stakeholder engagement, financial...
Practitioner