Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Budgeting

Challenges related to insufficient/inappropriate budget allocation, or caused by complex budget processes and management.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Budgeting

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
The Republic of Korea has long had a notoriously high number of pedestrian fatalities from road crashes. Part of the reason was high speed limits. The speed limit on national highways of four lanes or more was 80 kilometers per hour— even in areas where highways passed through towns or villages. After launching a plan to drastically reduce road deaths in 2015, Korea held a public contest for road safety ideas. The winning idea—dubbed “the village zone”—proposed reducing speed limits and putting in place special road signs and markings on sections of high-speed roads near population centers.  The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport adopted the idea and delegated the project to the Korea Transport Institute (KOTI), a government research institute. Implementing village zones—...
Case study
In the wake of a series of unfortunate accidents in the mid-1990s, citizens called for stronger safety measures and infrastructure mapping in the Republic of Korea. This was particularly the case in Seoul, home to a quarter of the Korean population. Although the Seoul government made progress in construction safety over the next decade, use of geospatial data remained low until Seoul publicly disclosed its geospatial data, which created synergies in map-based services and public administration. The government overcame multiple challenges along the way, introducing new ordinances to allow the exchange of data between public and private sectors and leveraging partners’ resources to cut budget spending. Citizens took advantage of the user-friendly map-making interface for purposes such as...
Case study
Facing a rise in crime and emergency situations, the Korean city of Daejeon collaborated with the national government to implement a “smart city” solution that enabled real-time information-sharing in criminal investigations and emergency response. Daejeon, the fifth-most populous city in the Republic of Korea, was the first Korean city to integrate local information and communications technology infrastructure such as municipal networks and closed-circuit televisions. Integrating municipal technology infrastructure and reorganizing related agencies presented inter-agency coordination challenges. In particular, Daejeon needed to overcome institutional barriers to enable real-time data sharing for its smart emergency response system. In 2013, Daejeon opened the Smart City Operation Center...
Case study
Malabon City has long been one of the areas with the highest rates of malnutrition in the capital region of the Philippines. In 2013, 16.3 percent of children in the city were stunted, or short for their age because of low nutritional intake. Stunting causes diminished cognitive and physical development, which limits the productive capacity of children. The high stunting rate meant a huge loss in human capital potential for the city. The city’s Nutrition Office had found it difficult to reduce the incidence of malnutrition because of budgetary constraints and a lack of awareness among mothers and caregivers about proper child nutrition. In 2014, the local government started to prioritize eliminating malnutrition by drafting a comprehensive nutrition plan that involved attracting donors...
Practitioner
Axel Baeumler is a Senior Infrastructure Economist working in the World Bank’s Middle East and North Africa region. He is working on urbanization, regional development and climate change challenges across the region. He has been at the World Bank since 2000 and has held different corporate and regional assignments, including in the East Asia Pacific Region. He is also co-editor and author of an edited book on “Sustainable Low Carbon City Development in China”. Prior to joining the World Bank, he worked at the Boston Consulting Group. Axel holds degrees in Economics from Oxford University, London School of Economics, and the European University institute.
Practitioner
Guangming Yan is Senior Urban Development Specialist in the World Bank’s Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience Global Practice. His specializations include sustainable urbanization, infrastructure investment, cultural heritage conservation and sustainable tourism, agglomeration economies, municipal finance, spatial planning, and brownfield redevelopment, etc.  He has managed a series of urban development and cultural heritage conservation projects in Zhejiang, Guizhou and Shandong provinces.
Case study
Overview The city of Shaoxing implemented the Shaoxing Historic City Center Conservation Component, one of seven components of the World Bank-supported Zhejiang Urban Environment Project, from 2004 to 2011. While the Zhejiang Urban Environment Project aimed to improve sanitation and the urban environment in the booming seaboard cities of Zhejiang Province, the Shaoxing Historic City Center Conservation Component focused on preserving historic neighborhoods of Shaoxing city and improving the living conditions of local residents. This case study records how Shaoxing established a conservation model that integrated local economic development and increased resident participation in the project, thereby ensuring project success. After a period of discussion, the project adopted an integrated “...
Case study
Context In Kenya, access to education has been uneven. In the two decades after independence, the country made steady progress toward equal education opportunities. In the 1990s, this trend reversed significantly as the costs of education were largely pushed from the government to households. By the 2002 presidential elections, the opposition party ran on a platform of universal primary education, among other issues, and won the election. International donors, long absent because of poor governance and systemic corruption, reengaged in the education sector. Free primary education was rolled out in 2003. The policy allowed children to be admitted without charge and banned all levies. It lifted the biggest constraint to attending school—household cash outlays for school fees; yet households...
Case study
Context Cape Town is a metropolis of deep biodiversity and diverse demographics. Of its residents, 48 percent are mixed race or "colored," 32 percent are black, and 20 percent are white or Asian. The Cape Floristic Region nurtures more than half the world’s flora, fauna, birds, and beasts. But South Africa’s second-largest city, by 2006, had lost nearly three-quarters of its natural habitat and about 95 percent of its revenue stream. For every house built, 50 families were left waiting. The city averaged six murders per day (City of Cape Town 2006). Years of fast-changing coalitions had fostered revolving-door governments. Gradually, seven local authorities absorbed the 35 apartheid-era municipalities and instituted cross-subsidizing ("Unicity"). The buildout of infrastructure and...
Practitioner
Daria Taglioni is a lead economist in the Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of The World Bank Group and the Global Solutions Lead for Global Value Chains. Her experience in economic policy analysis covers issues of trade, international competitiveness, globalization, and the links between financial markets and trade. Prior to joining the World Bank, Daria worked at the European Central Bank, and at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. She holds a PhD in International Economics from the Graduate Institute, Geneva.
Practitioner
R. Mukami Kariuki, is currently the World Bank, Sector Manager for Urban Development and Services in East and Southern Africa; and thematic coordinator for Urban Development in Africa. An Urban and Regional Planner by training, she has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of decentralization, local capacity building, urban/regional development planning, and infrastructure and service delivery. Her work experience spans several continents and a range of urban sector priorities including slum upgrading, disaster management, local government and decentralization; it includes specialization in the water sector, including pro-poor water supply and sanitation services, local and small private service providers, services for small towns. She has written or contributed to a number of...
Practitioner
Mr. Ivan Rossignol is the Chief Technical Specialist, Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of the World Bank Group. In this global role, Ivan leads the Bank knowledge and operational agenda on issues related to Growth Strategies and Competitiveness. He focuses on clusters, value chains, enclave approaches (incl. economic zones and growth poles), and growth corridors. He also leads the practice’s work on Fragile and Conflict Affected countries. Prior to his current role, he was the World Bank’s Manager for the Finance and Private Sector unit in South Asia, where his team handled issues such as the Kabul Bank crisis (Afghanistan), the India Manufacturing Growth plan, SME development (Sri Lanka). In over 20 years with the World Bank Group, Ivan has held several positions, including...
Practitioner
José Cuesta is a development economist with a Ph.D. in economics from Oxford University. He is an affiliated professor at Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy. Cuesta was previously an assistant professor in development economics at the Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands. He also worked as a research economist and social sector specialist for the Inter-American Development Bank, and as an economist for the United Nations Development Programme in Honduras. Cuesta's research interests revolve around poverty and conflict economics, specifically the distributive analysis of social policies; intra-household allocation; social protection and labor distortions. He also studies the interaction between poverty, conflict and culture. A Spanish national,...
Practitioner
William works in the World Bank's central water unit on water strategy and hydropower. From 2006 to 2012 William lived in Lao PDR, where he was Team Leader for the World Bank’s support to the Nam Theun 2 Hydropower Project as well as for a hydropower and mining technical assistance project. Prior to moving to Vientiane, William worked for the World Bank’s corporate strategy group where he led a team responsible for helping senior management think about the long-term strategic challenges facing the World Bank, including developing scenarios about how the world and international development could evolve by 2020. William received a MPA from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, which he attended on a Fulbright scholarship, and also has degrees in international politics and...
Practitioner
Sumila Gulyani is currently the Global Lead for Urban Development Strategy and Analytics at the World Bank. From 2012-2014, she served as Manager for Urban Development, Water Supply and Sanitation, and Disaster Risk Management in the Europe and Central Asia Region of the World Bank. The unit’s active portfolio included 38 projects totaling US$4 billion. From 2008-2011, she was based in Kenya as Sector Leader for Sustainable Development for 6 African countries. From 2005-2007, Ms. Gulyani was at Columbia University in New York where she held the position of Assistant Professor and also served as the founding Director of the Infrastructure and Poverty Action Lab (I-PAL). Prior to that, she has held several other positions at the World Bank. Ms. Gulyani received her Ph.D. in Economic...
Practitioner
Niels Holm-Nielsen is Regional Coordinator for Disaster Risk Management in Latin America and the Caribbean for the World Bank. Niels joined the Latin America group as a Disaster Risk Management specialist in 2008 from MENA. He has in the past couple of years led the Disaster Risk Management program in Colombia and the Caribbean, leading the preparation and Board approval of several DRM Investment operations, Emergency Recovery Operations, and a Cat DDO, in addition to a large portfolio of grant funded projects. In MENA he worked on water management, climate adaptation, and disaster risk management operations in Iran, Jordan and Yemen. Before joining the World Bank he worked for the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) for five years, where he helped create the corporate policy on...
Practitioner
Doyle Gallegos is the World Bank's Lead ICT Policy Specialist. In this role, Mr. Gallegos leads the Bank’s telecommunications policy and regulatory agenda, regional backbone and rural connectivity programs, and implementation of PPPs in client countries. Prior to joining the World Bank he worked as a consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton as a Senior Advisor and as a Senior Manager in Deloitte Consulting throughout the Middle East, Latin America, Europe, and US. Mr. Gallegos also has held VP level positions with telecom start-up and emerging business enterprises. Mr. Gallegos has an MBA in Finance from the Wharton School and an undergraduate degree in Economics from Columbia University.
Practitioner
As Practice Manager in the Social Protection, Labor and Jobs Global Practice, Hana Brixi leads the engagement in the MNA region. Prior to this position, she led the Global Solutions Group on Public Service Delivery in the Governance Global Practice, and served as Program Leader for the Gulf countries and Lead Economist for Human Development in the MNA region. In her career, Hana has been advancing World Bank engagement on human development, governance and public finance especially in the MNA, East Asia and Europe & Central Asia regions. Based in China during 2001-10, she also served as World Health Organization’s Coordinator for Health Sector Development and UNICEF Social Policy Chief, and she taught as a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, School of Public Policy and...