Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Beneficiary targeting

Challenges with ensuring that the appropriate beneficiary group is targeted.

Interactive

|

Percentage of Projects with Beneficiary targeting

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
This case study examines how JICA and the Royal Thai Government collaborated on a project to strengthen the Multi-Disciplinary Teams approach to protect victims of human trafficking. Human trafficking is a serious human rights violation that can destroy lives, undermining families and communities while weakening the rule of law and strengthening transnational organized crime networks. Thailand is a source, destination, and transit country for men, women, and child victims of forced labor and sex trafficking. In recognition of the seriousness of the problem and the scope for increasing vulnerability in the context of both global and ASEAN community economic integration, the Royal Thai Government, local and international NGOs, and international organizations have made efforts to address...
Case study
This case study (coming soon) examines UNICEF’s No Lost Generation, or Min Ila, Program, which was a cash transfer program for displaced Syrian refugee children in Lebanon. The program provided referrals to complementary services, including psychosocial support, health services, and child protection, to help alleviate barriers to education beyond income. These services aimed to target obstacles (e.g., mental and physical health, and negative coping strategies) to school attendance. Min Ila was the only child-focused social assistance program for refugee families in Lebanon at the time. It reached approximately 50,000 children over two years. The program provided case transfers on a regular basis, referrals to complementary services, and household visits. A 2018 evaluation found the...
Case study
In the early 2000s, the Republic of Korea introduced a system of paid maternity and parental leave to increase female labor force participation and fertility rates by mitigating hardships for female workers after childbirth. The source of financial support in the process of introducing the system lacked consensus, however. The Ministry of Labor consulted with stakeholders and encouraged political parties to agree to adopt the paid leave system. Key stakeholders and political parties opposed the paid leave system or preferred health insurance to employment insurance as a funding source. Finally, acknowledging practical barriers to those avenues, they agreed to employment insurance as a primary funding mechanism. Many mothers, but very few fathers, used the system. Incentivizing paternal...
Case study
In the wake of a series of unfortunate accidents in the mid-1990s, citizens called for stronger safety measures and infrastructure mapping in the Republic of Korea. This was particularly the case in Seoul, home to a quarter of the Korean population. Although the Seoul government made progress in construction safety over the next decade, use of geospatial data remained low until Seoul publicly disclosed its geospatial data, which created synergies in map-based services and public administration. The government overcame multiple challenges along the way, introducing new ordinances to allow the exchange of data between public and private sectors and leveraging partners’ resources to cut budget spending. Citizens took advantage of the user-friendly map-making interface for purposes such as...
Case study
This delivery note focuses on a conditional cash transfer program in the Philippines. Called the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, which roughly translates into “building bridges for Filipino families” the initiative, first implemented in 2007, was designed to assist the poor by directly providing them with money. Unlike conventional social assistance programs, however, the beneficiaries received the grants only if they fulfilled certain conditions. Those conditions include enrolling their children in school and ensuring that they maintain attendance rates of at least 85 percent, taking their children on regular clinic visits for basic health services (such as immunization and growth monitoring), and regularly attending sessions where the beneficiaries learned about topics such as...
Case study
This delivery note examines the implementation of the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP). It particularly focuses on how Ghana fostered coordination among institutions and stakeholders, and how it adapted the program over time in response to evidence.  From the mid-2000s through 2014, Ghana made significant gains in measures of human capital. The school enrollment rate rose and by 2011 had exceeded the world average. The likelihood that a 15-year-old child would survive to age 60 increased as well. One important step in Ghana’s effort to develop its human capital was the GSFP. This multi-sectoral program, initiated in 2005, had multiple objectives: it was a nutrition program, an education program, and a social safety net.  The school feeding program had positive effects on learning...
Case study
Across The Gambia, many people lack access to basic financial services that would allow them to borrow and save money. The problem is particularly prevalent in rural areas, where very few banks have branches, and as a result, most rural dwellers—particularly women—remain unbanked. Without savings or access to credit, families struggle to grow their income and improve their wellbeing. To address the problem, Irish Aid, Ireland’s international development aid organization, funded Improving Access to Pro-Poor Financial Services in Sierra Leone and The Gambia, a project launched in 2015 by the National Association of Cooperative Credit Unions of The Gambia (NACCUG) (Dalzell and O’Sullivan 2018). The initiative aimed to provide financial services to poor rural communities by helping credit...
Practitioner
Ximing Zhang is a Senior Dams Specialist working in the World Bank’s Water Global Practice. He has been working on dam safety management, irrigation and agricultural development, flood and watershed management in globally. He has been working at the World Bank since 2005 and has held different corporate and regional assignment, including in the East Asia Pacific Region, South Asia Region, Africa Region, Latin American and Carrabin Region and Europe and Central Asia Region, etc. Prior to joining the World Bank, he worked at the Ministry of Water Resources in China. Ximing holds degrees in Hydropower Engineering, Hydraulics and Business Administration in Finance from Tsinghua University, Leeds University and Maryland University.
Case study
Overview Jiangxi Province, on the southern bank of the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, is one of China’s largest agricultural producers. However, Jiangxi is characterized by uneven and slow rural development, rough agricultural production techniques, and low income among farmers. In recent years, productivity has suffered from bottlenecks in agricultural infrastructure, a lack of access to market, and inadequate production technology and technical knowledge and capabilities among farmers. In 2004 the province proposed a large-scale agricultural project to improve rural and agricultural development in the province, focusing on water conservation, irrigation, drainage infrastructure, agricultural productivity, and market systems. This case study looks at the Chinese Government’s...
Case study
This case study examines the Republic of Korea’s Rural Electrification Project, which was carried out by the Korean government and Korea Electricity Power Corporation (KEPCO) between 1970 and 1987. The main purpose of this project was to achieve the nationwide electrification by offering long-term, low-interest loans. These loans were to be used for the construction of distribution facilities to rural residents who were regionally and financially disadvantaged, and not on large-scale transmission facilities, which would diminish return on investments. The Rural Electrification Project was a pioneering project intended to upgrade the education, culture, health, and hygiene in these areas, and was designed to develop the economy by increasing the productivity of these rural residents. As...
Case study
Context In Kenya, access to education has been uneven. In the two decades after independence, the country made steady progress toward equal education opportunities. In the 1990s, this trend reversed significantly as the costs of education were largely pushed from the government to households. By the 2002 presidential elections, the opposition party ran on a platform of universal primary education, among other issues, and won the election. International donors, long absent because of poor governance and systemic corruption, reengaged in the education sector. Free primary education was rolled out in 2003. The policy allowed children to be admitted without charge and banned all levies. It lifted the biggest constraint to attending school—household cash outlays for school fees; yet households...
Practitioner
As the Global Leader for Sustainable Infrastructure and Services at the World Bank Group, Paul hopes to be able to provide value and help cities deal with their enormous challenges by successfully integrating the planning, social, technical and financial aspects of urban development. Recent changes such as large migration and extreme weather events require new and innovative solutions in the urban space. Paul has more than 20 years of experience in urban development and infrastructure projects in large, medium and small cities. He has identified, prepared and executed large-scale investment programs for the World Bank targeting urban and rural infrastructure all across the world. Over this time, he has demonstrated that providing attention to details can significantly improve results and...
Practitioner
Ms. Carvajal is a specialist in the subject of negotiation and alternative dispute resolution. She obtained her MBA with an emphasis on Marketing at the University of San Diego in California and holds a degree in Law from the University of Costa Rica. Her work over the last decade has provided her with extensive experience in the area of public service. She has specialized in Alternative Conflict Resolution Methods and is currently a member of the Centro Internacional de Arbitraje y Conciliación Comercial (International Center for Arbitration and Commercial Conciliation). She was a member of Road Safety Committee, which is led by the Fundación Internacional de Automovilismo (International Automobile Foundation). As Minister of Public Works and Transportation in Costa Rica she achieved a...
Practitioner
Omar Arias is the Practice Lead Economist of the Social Protection and Labor Global Practice and Global Lead for skills at the World Bank. Previously he was acting Sector Manager and Lead Economist in the Human Development Economics Unit for the World Bank Europe and Central Asia region; the sector leader of Human Development for Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela; a senior economist in the Poverty and Gender Group of the Latin American region; and a research economist at the Inter-American Development Bank. He has been a co-author of various analytical studies, including recent regional reports on pensions (“The Inverting Pyramid: Pension Systems Facing Demographic Challenges in Europe and Central Asia”) and jobs ("Back to Work: Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia...
Practitioner
Daria Taglioni is a lead economist in the Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice of The World Bank Group and the Global Solutions Lead for Global Value Chains. Her experience in economic policy analysis covers issues of trade, international competitiveness, globalization, and the links between financial markets and trade. Prior to joining the World Bank, Daria worked at the European Central Bank, and at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. She holds a PhD in International Economics from the Graduate Institute, Geneva.
Practitioner
R. Mukami Kariuki, is currently the World Bank, Sector Manager for Urban Development and Services in East and Southern Africa; and thematic coordinator for Urban Development in Africa. An Urban and Regional Planner by training, she has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of decentralization, local capacity building, urban/regional development planning, and infrastructure and service delivery. Her work experience spans several continents and a range of urban sector priorities including slum upgrading, disaster management, local government and decentralization; it includes specialization in the water sector, including pro-poor water supply and sanitation services, local and small private service providers, services for small towns. She has written or contributed to a number of...