Delivery Challenges

Delivery Challenge: Awareness and communication strategy

Challenges stemming from inability to raise awareness or unwillingness/inability to share relevant information with beneficiaries and/or the general public.

Interactive

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Percentage of Projects with Awareness and communication strategy

  • Less than 25%
  • 25 - 50%
  • 50 - 75%
  • More than 75%

Any information shown on this map do not imply, on the part of the Global Delivery Initiative, any judgment or endorsement on the status of any territory.

Case study
Waste minimization and pollution prevention are major development challenges for Turkey, given its population and industrial growth. Industry is a large contributor to waste generation, but a number of barriers and risks prevent companies from being first movers and adopting new practices and technologies that could reduce waste. This case study examines an initiative to overcome these hurdles in Turkey. To encourage companies to reduce waste, in 2015 the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) launched the Near Zero Waste (NØW) program with three interlinked components: 1) a selection of sub-projects supported by concessional financing from the Climate Investment Funds’ (CIF) Clean Technology Fund (CTF) and technical assessments to help companies adopt new waste...
Case study
Rapid urbanization and economic development in Ghana since the 1990s led to a rise in the number of informal settlements and slums. By 2010, more than half of the urban population lived in such communities, and many lacked access to public services. Most inhabitants also had little to no knowledge about their rights as citizens and had no say in the allocation of public resources. In an effort to remedy the situation, the city governments of two of the country’s biggest cities—Accra and Sekondi-Takoradi—introduced reforms in their planning and budgeting process through the IncluCity project. An international nonprofit organization named Global Communities led implementation of the project from October 2011 to September 2015.  The overarching objective was to improve participation of the...
Case study
This case study (coming soon) examines UNICEF’s No Lost Generation, or Min Ila, Program, which was a cash transfer program for displaced Syrian refugee children in Lebanon. The program provided referrals to complementary services, including psychosocial support, health services, and child protection, to help alleviate barriers to education beyond income. These services aimed to target obstacles (e.g., mental and physical health, and negative coping strategies) to school attendance. Min Ila was the only child-focused social assistance program for refugee families in Lebanon at the time. It reached approximately 50,000 children over two years. The program provided case transfers on a regular basis, referrals to complementary services, and household visits. A 2018 evaluation found the...
Case study
This case study examines how the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) tackled an outbreak of Lassa fever and moved from this response to institute a long-term plan to prevent and respond to future outbreaks.  In late 2015, an outbreak of Lassa fever—an acute hemorrhagic fever caused by a virus usually transmitted by rodents—threatened thousands of lives across Nigeria. By the end of December, the outbreak had spread to 14 states and the Federal Capital Territory, infecting more than 400 Nigerians and killing more than 40. The prevalence of cases forced the government to act quickly to diagnose and treat people before the outbreak became an epidemic. Learning from its experience containing the Ebola virus in 2014, the Nigerian government set up a response team, distributed essential...
Case study
This delivery note examines the implementation of the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP). It particularly focuses on how Ghana fostered coordination among institutions and stakeholders, and how it adapted the program over time in response to evidence.  From the mid-2000s through 2014, Ghana made significant gains in measures of human capital. The school enrollment rate rose and by 2011 had exceeded the world average. The likelihood that a 15-year-old child would survive to age 60 increased as well. One important step in Ghana’s effort to develop its human capital was the GSFP. This multi-sectoral program, initiated in 2005, had multiple objectives: it was a nutrition program, an education program, and a social safety net.  The school feeding program had positive effects on learning...
Case study
Introduction Farmers in Isabela, a province in the Philippines, have long suffered from natural disasters such as flooding and drought. In recent years, climate change has made life even more difficult for farmers in the area. Droughts lasted longer, typhoons became more frequent, and the timing of seasons varied unexpectedly, making it difficult for farmers to predict rainfall. Most farmers in the region depended solely on rainfall to cultivate crops, which meant they could harvest only once a year. As a consequence, farms had low productivity, and many farmers struggled to get by. In 2009, the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA), the Republic of Korea’s international aid organization, launched the East Asia Climate Partnership (EACP), and the Philippines became a partner...
Case study
Malabon City has long been one of the areas with the highest rates of malnutrition in the capital region of the Philippines. In 2013, 16.3 percent of children in the city were stunted, or short for their age because of low nutritional intake. Stunting causes diminished cognitive and physical development, which limits the productive capacity of children. The high stunting rate meant a huge loss in human capital potential for the city. The city’s Nutrition Office had found it difficult to reduce the incidence of malnutrition because of budgetary constraints and a lack of awareness among mothers and caregivers about proper child nutrition. In 2014, the local government started to prioritize eliminating malnutrition by drafting a comprehensive nutrition plan that involved attracting donors...
Case study
Indonesia’s nearly 260 million inhabitants live on 7,000 islands extending 5,000 kilometers east to west. The fourth most populous country, with 34 provinces and nearly 500 districts, Indonesia consistently ranks among the world’s top 10 greenhouse gas emitters. Land-use changes such as the conversion of forest cover to agriculture and the burning of forest and peat are the country’s top sources of emissions, followed by energy use and waste management. In 2007, Indonesia hosted the 13th Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and declared, along with other developing countries, its resolution to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2009, at the Group of Twenty (G20) meeting, the president of Indonesia committed the country to reducing its...
Practitioner
Prof. Taejong Kim is currently a professor at the KDI School of Public Policy and Management. Before joining the faculty at the KDI School, he taught at York University, Canada, and at GRIPS, Japan. His research and teaching interests include public finance, labor economics, microeconomics, and applied microeconomics. He obtained a B.A. and M.A. in economics from Seoul National University and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Kim currently is the Chair of MDP (Master of Development Policy) at KDI School of Public Policy and Management.
Practitioner
Ximing Zhang is a Senior Dams Specialist working in the World Bank’s Water Global Practice. He has been working on dam safety management, irrigation and agricultural development, flood and watershed management in globally. He has been working at the World Bank since 2005 and has held different corporate and regional assignment, including in the East Asia Pacific Region, South Asia Region, Africa Region, Latin American and Carrabin Region and Europe and Central Asia Region, etc. Prior to joining the World Bank, he worked at the Ministry of Water Resources in China. Ximing holds degrees in Hydropower Engineering, Hydraulics and Business Administration in Finance from Tsinghua University, Leeds University and Maryland University.
Practitioner
Aurelio Menéndez is the World Bank's Practice Manager for the East Africa transport sector. As part of his duties he supervises key regional research and transport projects. Dr. Menéndez's experience spans many World Bank areas including East Asia Pacific's transport unit, where he was sector leader and senior transport economist. Dr. Menéndez holds doctoral degrees in road engineering from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and in urban planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
Case study
Overview This case study examines the Flood Management and Drainage Improvement Project of Huai River Basin, with a particular focus on tracing the process of establishing Farmer Drainage and Irrigation Associations (FDIAs) along the Taidong River in Jiangsu Province. FDIAs are legally established local entities responsible for management and operation of small drainage and irrigation works, with membership composed of beneficiary farmers in a bounded drainage and irrigation area. This study examines how placing beneficiaries in charge of the management, operation, and maintenance of these small-scale water conservation projects led to improved operations. Lessons Learned It is important to transform views of local officials and farmers to enable the establishment of group projects....
Case study
Overview This case study focuses on the Tongling-Tangkou Highway (TTH) project. The highway was built to address the development challenge of poor transportation access in low-income areas, and the consequent barrier this presented to tourism and the local economy. In particular, the case study examines how the agency responsible for implementing the project, the Anhui Provincial Communications Department (APCD), responded to and minimized any potentially adverse effects of the TTH on the environment, and on the lives of local residents resettled during its construction. The case study finds that the key factors in the success of the TTH’s construction were: mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating the project’s progress; an adaptive implementation mechanism that enabled the project teams...
Case study
Context At the turn of the 21st century, only 30 percent of Latin American citizens had access to the Internet. In recent years, this number has doubled to 62 percent, but the gains are unevenly distributed (ITU 2015). The region still lags Europe and North America in network speeds and full mobile access. Digitally connecting the hemisphere remains one of the key challenges for Latin America to fully leverage the potential of information and communication technology (ICT) to boost productivity and enhance government efficiency. The nation of Uruguay is a notable outlier in these regional trends. In the early 2000s, the government recognized the economic and social gains from a web-connected citizenry and devised a far-reaching plan to improve the country’s mobile and Internet...
Case study
Context Despite the enormous reductions in child mortality across the world, the African continent remains a perilous place for mothers and newborns. The region accounts for almost half of all maternal deaths worldwide (WHO 2016). Besides the terrible loss of life, maternal deaths take a toll on surviving family members, hampering their health, education, and economic opportunities. In Zambia in 2010, there were 591 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. A woman’s lifetime risk of maternal death is 3 times higher in Sub-Saharan Africa than it is in South Asia and almost 30 times higher than that in developing countries (WHO and others 2014, 68). Despite modest improvements in health since the 1990s, by 2010 the maternal rate of mortality had not improved in Zambia. Knowledge of infant...
Case study
Context The province of Gauteng occupies 2 percent of South Africa’s landmass yet generates nearly 40 percent of its gross domestic product and houses two major cities and a major airport. Historically, the province and its public transport developed unevenly, ushering a culture of private cars and unsafe, unreliable rail transit. Road congestion leads to limited economic productivity, living standards, and tourism. The juxtaposition of Gautrain’s multibillion-dollar budget with less well-supported essential social services and poverty reduction measures evoked public anger and media criticism. Of 700 community meetings in 2002, all were volatile and precipitated strong local political opposition and negative media. Residential pressure groups filed five court cases and pressure was...
Case study
This delivery case study examines how the Republic of Korea implemented policies, beginning in the 1990s, to ensure that people with disabilities who wanted to work could have access to equal work opportunities. To download and read the full case study, click here. To read a condensed delivery note, prepared by Yongjin Lee, click here. Context Beginning in the 1950s, economic policies in the Republic of Korea did not focus intensively on the welfare and employment of people with disabilities. However, by the 1980s, the public and policymakers turned their attention to this issue. Development Challenge The core development challenge was to increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities who wanted to work.  Intervention Policymakers responded to growing public calls for...
Multimedia
In this video Jenny Robinson, Fellow with the Brookings Institution, Center for Universal Education, talks about how to address specific delivery challenges in order to scale quality learning for children and youth in low- and middle-income countries around the world.
Practitioner
Practitioner